Welcome to the Scholarly Open Access Repository at the University of Southern Indiana--SOAR at USI.

SOAR at USI is a digital collection of scholarship, research, and creative works produced by faculty, students, staff, and other members of the USI community. SOAR at USI is administered by the Rice Library in cooperation with various departments and academic units of the University.

Scholars interested in contributing to SOAR at USI may contact their Library liasion or the SOAR at USI administrators at scholcomm@usi.edu

  • Conducting an Inventory with Shared Print in Mind

    Michaels, Sherri; Neel, Becca
    A physical inventory of the open stacks collection at Indiana University was conducted to determine the rate of error in the corresponding bibliographic records. The inventory was started to address some errors that were found when materials were pulled for offsite storage, but took on an increased importance as participation in shared print programs increased. This article describes the methodology used to conduct the inventory, as well as the rate of error found in the records for a large, open stack collection. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Collection Management on September 9, 2020 available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/10.1080/01462679.2020.1818343 Inventory dataset available at: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/592
  • Utilizing Video-Based Trainings to Improve Decision Making in High School Quarterbacks

    Powless, Matthew D.; Steinfeldt, Jesse A.; Fisher, Shelbi E.; McFadden, Patrick; Kennedy, Kyle W.; Bellini, Scott
    Despite working memory capacity’s (WMC) role in decision-making, there is a dearth of empirical literature concerned with working memory and how it relates to tactical decision-making in sport. The temporal occlusion paradigm has often been used by sport researchers to improve tactical decision-making and, thus, provides a well-established foundation for creating decision-making trainings. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to explore the implementation of computer-based learning modules to improve the tactical decision-making of four high school quarterbacks with varying levels of WMC, utilizing a single-subject, multiple baseline design. The learning modules utilized a temporal occlusion paradigm and present a novel intervention aimed at improving decision-making in quarterbacks. Data were analyzed using visual analysis and improvement rate difference (IRD). Overall, results did not demonstrate a causal relationship between changes in accuracy of decision-making after implementation of the learning modules, but did provide moderate evidence for improvement in reaction time for decision-making due to the learning modules. The learning modules were met with positive perceptions from the four participants, and the participant with the lowest WMC showed evidence of improvement in both accuracy and speed of decision-making. Limitations as well as implications will be discussed.
  • Herman B Wells Library Inventory Dataset, May 2015-December 2018

    Neel, Becca; Michaels, Sherri
    This dataset documents the bibliographic, status, and physical location errors discovered during the May 2015 - December 2018 inventory cycle of the Herman B Wells Library's physical collections. Data was collected and is organized by call number range.
  • The Influence of Confucianism on the Emergence and Regulation of Nonprofits in China

    Engbers, Trent
    In 2009, The Ministry of Civil Affairs (MoCA) of the People’s Republic of China commissioned a study of international experiences with the use of direct and indirect public policies for nonprofit organizations to deliver social and human services. While the study does produce a number of practical and interesting policy recommendations for the MoCA, there is an inherent problem with this type of research in that it assumes that lessons learned from one county context can be applied to other political and cultural domains without recognizing the unique cultural elements that shape the policy context. In China, a major cultural consideration is the influence of Confucian and Neo-Confucian traditions and beliefs. The Confucian tradition with its focus on the group over the individual and on responsibilities over rights seems to be highly conducive to fostering a robust system of nonprofit organizations (Fukuyama, 1995). However, the conclusion of this paper is the influence of Confucianism is complex and that is sometimes helps and sometimes hinders the development of the nonprofit sector. This study examines four Confucian values (Shu 恕, Ren 仁, Li 礼 and Wu lun 五伦) and their impact on the sector today.
  • Meat and Mental Health: a Systematic Review of Meat Abstention and Depression, Anxiety, and Related Phenomena

    Dobersek, Urska; Wy, Gabrielle; Adkins, Joshua; Altmeyer, Sydney; Krout, Kaitlin; Lavie, Carl; Archer, Edward
    Objective: To examine the relation between the consumption or avoidance of meat and psychological health and well-being. Methods: A systematic search of online databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL Plus, Medline, and Cochrane Library) was conducted for primary research examining psychological health in meat-consumers and meat-abstainers. Inclusion criteria were the provision of a clear distinction between meat-consumers and meat-abstainers, and data on factors related to psychological health. Studies examining meat consumption as a continuous or multi-level variable were excluded. Summary data were compiled, and qualitative analyses of methodologic rigor were conducted. The main outcome was the disparity in the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and related conditions in meat-consumers versus meat-abstainers. Secondary outcomes included mood and self-harm behaviors Results: Eighteen studies met the inclusion/exclusion criteria; representing 160,257 participants (85,843 females and 73,232 males) with 149,559 meat-consumers and 8584 meat-abstainers (11 to 96 years) from multiple geographic regions. Analysis of methodologic rigor revealed that the studies ranged from low to severe risk of bias with high to very low confidence in results. Eleven of the 18 studies demonstrated that meat-abstention was associated with poorer psychological health, four studies were equivocal, and three showed that meat-abstainers had better outcomes. The most rigorous studies demonstrated that the prevalence or risk of depression and/or anxiety were significantly greater in participants who avoided meat consumption. Conclusion: Studies examining the relation between the consumption or avoidance of meat and psychological health varied substantially in methodologic rigor, validity of interpretation, and confidence in results. The majority of studies, and especially the higher quality studies, showed that those who avoided meat consumption had significantly higher rates or risk of depression, anxiety, and/or self-harm behaviors. There was mixed evidence for temporal relations, but study designs and a lack of rigor precluded inferences of causal relations. Our study does not support meat avoidance as a strategy to benefit psychological health.

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