Welcome to the Scholarly Open Access Repository at the University of Southern Indiana--SOAR at USI.

SOAR at USI is a digital collection of scholarship, research, and creative works produced by faculty, students, staff, and other members of the USI community. SOAR at USI is administered by the Rice Library in cooperation with various departments and academic units of the University.

Scholars interested in contributing to SOAR at USI may contact their Library liaison or the SOAR at USI administrators at scholcomm@usi.edu

  • Herman B Wells Library Inventory Dataset, May 2015-December 2018

    Neel, Becca; Michaels, Sherri
    This dataset documents the bibliographic, status, and physical location errors discovered during the May 2015 - December 2018 inventory cycle of the Herman B Wells Library's physical collections. Data was collected and is organized by call number range.
  • The Influence of Confucianism on the Emergence and Regulation of Nonprofits in China

    Engbers, Trent
    In 2009, The Ministry of Civil Affairs (MoCA) of the People’s Republic of China commissioned a study of international experiences with the use of direct and indirect public policies for nonprofit organizations to deliver social and human services. While the study does produce a number of practical and interesting policy recommendations for the MoCA, there is an inherent problem with this type of research in that it assumes that lessons learned from one county context can be applied to other political and cultural domains without recognizing the unique cultural elements that shape the policy context. In China, a major cultural consideration is the influence of Confucian and Neo-Confucian traditions and beliefs. The Confucian tradition with its focus on the group over the individual and on responsibilities over rights seems to be highly conducive to fostering a robust system of nonprofit organizations (Fukuyama, 1995). However, the conclusion of this paper is the influence of Confucianism is complex and that is sometimes helps and sometimes hinders the development of the nonprofit sector. This study examines four Confucian values (Shu 恕, Ren 仁, Li 礼 and Wu lun 五伦) and their impact on the sector today.
  • Meat and Mental Health: a Systematic Review of Meat Abstention and Depression, Anxiety, and Related Phenomena

    Dobersek, Urska; Wy, Gabrielle; Adkins, Joshua; Altmeyer, Sydney; Krout, Kaitlin; Lavie, Carl; Archer, Edward
    Objective: To examine the relation between the consumption or avoidance of meat and psychological health and well-being. Methods: A systematic search of online databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL Plus, Medline, and Cochrane Library) was conducted for primary research examining psychological health in meat-consumers and meat-abstainers. Inclusion criteria were the provision of a clear distinction between meat-consumers and meat-abstainers, and data on factors related to psychological health. Studies examining meat consumption as a continuous or multi-level variable were excluded. Summary data were compiled, and qualitative analyses of methodologic rigor were conducted. The main outcome was the disparity in the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and related conditions in meat-consumers versus meat-abstainers. Secondary outcomes included mood and self-harm behaviors Results: Eighteen studies met the inclusion/exclusion criteria; representing 160,257 participants (85,843 females and 73,232 males) with 149,559 meat-consumers and 8584 meat-abstainers (11 to 96 years) from multiple geographic regions. Analysis of methodologic rigor revealed that the studies ranged from low to severe risk of bias with high to very low confidence in results. Eleven of the 18 studies demonstrated that meat-abstention was associated with poorer psychological health, four studies were equivocal, and three showed that meat-abstainers had better outcomes. The most rigorous studies demonstrated that the prevalence or risk of depression and/or anxiety were significantly greater in participants who avoided meat consumption. Conclusion: Studies examining the relation between the consumption or avoidance of meat and psychological health varied substantially in methodologic rigor, validity of interpretation, and confidence in results. The majority of studies, and especially the higher quality studies, showed that those who avoided meat consumption had significantly higher rates or risk of depression, anxiety, and/or self-harm behaviors. There was mixed evidence for temporal relations, but study designs and a lack of rigor precluded inferences of causal relations. Our study does not support meat avoidance as a strategy to benefit psychological health.
  • 3rd Annual Graduate Student Colloquium

    USI Graduate Studies
    In an effort to make this third annual Graduate Student Colloquium more accessible to our increasingly large number of students, both online as well as those on-campus, we have selected as its theme Accessibility. This theme also reflects the University of Southern Indiana’s 2015-2020 Strategic Plan, which included “access by design” as one of its three strategic goals. As the university transitions to its third strategic plan, we take this opportunity to celebrate Accessibility in all of its manifestations.
  • Advanced Care Planning: An Option for Quality End-of-Life Care

    Oliveira de Almeida, Taynara
    What is it? It would be inconceivable to any American to be forced to do something or be subjected to any treatment they disagree about. This is not the reality to many Americans, however, who face their last moments. Unfortunately, many Americans are still subjected to treatments, procedures, and medication they have not authorized. Advance Care Planning (ACP) is a process about reflection of goals and values and communicating them to family or friends to guarantee a patient’s wishes can be met if they are incapable in a life threating illness or an unexpected event. ACP is for every patient, their family, and the healthcare professionals involved in their care (McMahan, Knight, Fried & Sudore, 2013; Howard, et al., 2015; Respecting Choices, 2011). Legality According to the Universal Declaration of Bioethics and Human Rights (2006), no interest should overcome the well-being of an individual. The Declaration of Human Rights (1998), states that no one should go under inhumane or degrading treatment. The right to choose what treatments patients would like to receive or not is also defended by the bioethical principle of autonomy and the Patient Self-Determination Act (PSDA) (1990), a federal law that should be complied in order to people can control decisions that affect their health. Benefits Allowing patients to choose what care they would like to receive in their final moments of life guarantees dignity. By preventing unwanted treatments and procedures and guaranteeing their most important wishes. Preventing them to go under treatments that are not beneficial for them and guaranteeing they will have things that are really important to them (Houben, Spruit, Groenen, Wouters,  & Janssen, 2014). It is not possible to scientifically prove the benefits of ACP, but considering that ACP proposes a dialogue between a patient and those involve in their care, it shows benefits their relationship and prevents disagreements when the time to call for actions arrives (Kolarik, Arnold, Fischer & Tulsky, 2002, Sudore, et al., 2017). Howard, M., Bernard, C., Tan, A., Slaven, M., Klein, D., & Heyland, D. K. (2015). Advance care planning: Let’s start sooner. Canadian Family Physician, 61, 663–665. https://doi.org/10.7748/nop.29.4.19.s20 Houben, C. H. M., Spruit, M. A., Groenen, M. T. J., Wouters, E. F. M., & Janssen, D. J. A. (2014). Efficacy of advance care planning: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 15(7), 1–13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2014.01.008 Kolarik, R. C., Arnold, R. M., Fischer, G. S., & Tulsky, J. A. (2002). Objectives for Advance Care Planning. Journal of Palliative Medicine, 5(5), 697–704. https://doi.org/10.1089/109662102320880516 McMahan, R. D., Knight, S. J., Fried, T. R., & Sudore, R. L. (2013). Advance care planning beyond advance directives: Perspectives from patients and surrogates. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 46(3), 355–365. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2012.09.006 Organização das Nações Unidas. (1998). Declaração Universal dos Direitos Humanos. Brasília. Respecting Choices. (2011). First Steps ACP Interview Tool. United States of America. Sudore, R. L., Lum, H. D., You, J. J., Hanson, L. C., Meier, D. E., & Pantilat, S. Z. (2017). Defining advance care planning for adults: a consensus definition from a multidisciplinary delphi panel. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 53(5), 821–832. The Patient Self-Determination Act. A matter of life and death. - PubMed - NCBI. ([s.d.]). Retrieved February 17th ,2020, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10141946 UNESCO. (2006). Declaração Universal sobre Bioética e Direitos Humanos. Lisboa. U.S. Congress: Patient Self-Determination Act. Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA), Pub L 101- 508 (1990).

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