• Enhancement of Exam Preparation Skills

      Connerton, Charlotte; Bonhotal, Susan; Krieg, Sue
      Problem Statement: Does exam feedback by the faculty change the study habits and life choices of the students to be successful on an exam? Faculty feedback on exams has been identified to increase engagement and help students to verbalize their thought processes, analyze their performance on exams, and adjust study strategies to improve learning. Context: First semester baccalaureate nursing in two introductory nursing courses at a public university are completing “exam wrappers” after each exam. The students will be able to identify and reflect on exam preparation. Approach: The faculty used “exam wrappers” to collect data following each exam. An “exam wrapper” is a group of questions at the end of an exam which identify student study habits and life choices (i.e. study preparation, number of hours worked, and number of hours of sleep) prior to an exam. Using “exam wrappers” and exam scores, faculty were able to identify those students that struggled to pass exams. Once the student was identified, faculty reached out to discuss results and counsel on study habits and life choices. Faculty used a checklist which included: attendance at the meeting, review of “exam wrappers,” review of exam questions, test taking strategies, discussion of exam preparedness, and a referral to peer tutoring. Students who passed the exams were able to identify and reflect on exam preparedness. Results: Faculty consultation with the students improved the exam preparedness and exam scores. Discussion: Faculty learned that all students benefit from identification and reflection of exam preparation. “Exam wrappers” could be an additional tool for faculty to increase student engagement and motivation.
    • Interprofessional Peer-to-Peer Teaching

      Bonhotal, Susan; Kilbane, Janet; Seibert, Susan; Mason, Jessica; Bartek, Jennifer
      Focus: The purpose of this project was to promote interprofessional education by developing a relationship between first semester nursing students and second year Master’s level occupational therapy (MSOT) students as well as between first semester nursing students and first year dental hygiene students. The focus was implementation of peer-to-peer teaching. Interprofessional education is a universal means to facilitate relationships, develop collaboration, and promote communication between health care professionals. Context: First semester baccalaureate nursing in the Introduction to Professional Nursing course at a public university were introduced to interprofessional peer-to-peer teaching while learning basic nursing skills. Approach: Peer-to-peer teaching was endorsed by the Institute of Medicine (2003) as a method to improve the overall quality of health care. The project was implemented for basic nursing skills modules focusing on activity/immobility and oral hygiene. The MSOT students and dental hygiene students served as peer teachers, leaders, and role models, instructing and coaching 97 nursing students during two hour skills labs. MSOT students demonstrated and instructed activity and immobility skills including: gait belts, assisting patients out of bed, walking with crutches, walkers and canes, mechanical lifts, and transferring patients. The dental hygiene students demonstrated and instructed oral hygiene skills including brushing and flossing teeth. Results: The interprofessional peer-to-peer teaching was successfully implemented as noted by instructor observation of skill attainment and anecdotal narratives of student development of mutual respect for one another’s profession. Discussion: Faculty plan to continue the activity