• Internships and On-Line Capstone Courses: Transforming High Impact Teaching Practices and Fostering Equity and Inclusion during the COVID-19 Crisis and Beyond

      Brown, Kelly; Shine, Beau
      The COVID-19 crisis that hit the United States in March 2020 created untold obstacles and problems for higher education. With virtually no notice and a very short time-frame, faculty across the nation were required to move their courses to on-line instruction mid-semester. This challenge created numerous problems for administration, faculty, and students. Faculty rose to the challenge and through innovation and hard work were able to create on-line learning environments for students that met learning objectives while keeping students and faculty safe. Faculty teaching courses with hands-on learning experiences such as labs and fine arts courses faced additional challenges. This is especially true for faculty supervising internships. Internships are a high impact practice which allows students to work in a professional setting under the supervision and mentorship of community partners. During the COVID-19 crisis, faculty supervising internships had to navigate the concerns and policies of the agencies, departments, and businesses at which students were placed as well as those of their respective universities. Faculty had to transform practical, hands-on learning experiences in the communities into a comparable high impact practice on-line course. The process of transforming experiential learning to on-line capstone courses highlighted issue of equity and inclusion and their impact on student success. The purposes of this teaching practice session are to examine the experiences of transforming internships into capstone courses during the COVID-19 crisis and to facilitate a discussion on the broader issues facing internships and other high-impact practices in the context of equity, inclusion, and student success that were underscored during the pandemic. The need to address issues of equity, inclusion, and student success as they relate to high impact practices is critical to achieving the goals of higher education. The focus of this session is twofold. First, the session facilitators and participants will discuss the challenges faced by faculty during the COVID-19 crisis to move internship courses to on-line capstone courses while maintaining academic rigor and helping students achieve personal and professional goals normally acquired through internships. Second, the session will include a discussion of the challenges and solutions to fostering equity and inclusion in high impact practices, a need which has been identified in the literature and was highlighted during the pandemic crisis in Spring 2020. It is hoped that the facilitators and participants will bring to the discussion personal experiences and reflections on the challenges of transforming courses during the COVID-19 crisis and on the need to ensure student engagement and success through participation in high impact practices in underserved student groups. Ideally, practical solutions to the challenges faced by faculty teaching hands-on experiential learning courses will result from the discussion. Resources Brownell, J. E., & Swaner, L. E. (2010). Five High-Impact Practices: Research on Learning Outcomes, Completion, and Quality. Washington, D.C.: Association of American Colleges and Universities. Finley, A., & McNair, T. (2013). Assessing Underserved Students’ Engagement in High-Impact Practices. Washington, D.C.: Association of American Colleges and Universities Kuh, G. D. (2008). High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why they Matter. Washington, D.C.: Association of American Colleges and Universities. Kuh, G. D. (2013). Taking HIPs to the next level. Ensuring Quality and Taking High-Impact Practices to Scale. Washington, D.C.: Association of American Colleges and Universities. Kuh, G. D., O’Donnell, K., & Schneider, C. G. (2017). HIPs at ten. Change, September/October, 8-16. Lei, S. A., & Yin, D. (2019). Evaluating benefits and drawbacks of internships: Perspectives of college students. College Student Journal, 2, 181-189. O’Donnell, K. (2013). Bringing HIPs to scale. Ensuring Quality and Taking High-Impact Practices to Scale. Washington, D.C.: Association of American Colleges and Universities. O'Neill, N (2010). Internships as high-impact practice: Some reflections on quality. Peer Review, 12(4), 4-8. Parilla, P., & Smith-Cunnien, S. (1997). Criminal justice internships: Integrating the academic with the experiential. Journal of Criminal Justice Education, 8(2), 225-241.
    • Make Learning a Magical Experience: Sharing Reflections and Lessons Learned while Teaching an Applied Learning Travel Course

      Brown, Kelly; Fisher, Kelly
      This teaching practice session will review and discuss our experience with creating and teaching a multi-disciplinary travel course that incorporated several high impact practices and targeted the features of high-impact practices identified by Kuh and his colleagues as effectively improving student learning (Kuh, et al., 2017). Research demonstrates that applied learning experiences can be a highly effective method of teaching and learning by providing students with valuable hands-on, “real world” experiences. (Kuh, 2008; Kuh, 2013; Schneider, 2015). These learning experiences have been shown to increase academic achievement, retention, and graduation and allow students to acquire life skills that lead to personal and professional success (Kuh, et al., 2017). High impact practices in higher education can include writing and inquiry intensive courses, collaborative assignments and projects, and undergraduate research (Kuh, et al., 2017). Additional features of high impact practices include, among others, opportunity to reflect and integrate learning, interactions with faculty and peers about substantive matters, and opportunities to discover relevance of learning through real-world application (Kuh, 2013). This teaching practice session will discuss how these and other high-impact practices were incorporated into a multi-disciplinary travel course designed to increase student learning, engage students in an applied learning experience, and broaden student understanding of other disciplines and the world in which they live. This session reviews course and curriculum development, the challenges to teaching a high-impact travel course, and lessons learned from our experiences. The session will include a broader discussion with attendees to examine their own experiences with high impact practices and travel courses, to identify future challenges and potential solutions to travel and other courses, and to consider issues regarding curriculum development and the role travel and other high impact courses play in academia. The content of this teaching practice session can be applied more broadly to classes that do not include a travel requirement but that include other high impact practices. References Kuh, G. D. (2008). High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why they Matter. Washington, D.C.: Association of American Colleges and Universities. Kuh, G. D. (2013). Taking HIPs to the next level. Ensuring Quality and Taking High-Impact Practices to Scale. Washington, D.C.: Association of American Colleges and Universities. Kuh, G. D., O’Donnell, K., & Schneider, C. G. (2017). HIPs at ten. Change, September/October, 8-16. Schneider, C. G. (2015). The LEAP challenge: Transforming for students, essential for liberal education. Liberal Education, Winter/Spring: 10-18.