• A Process for RN-BSN Program Evaluation

      Connerton, Charlotte; Doerner, Mary
      Topic/Problem Statement Evaluation of a programs outcomes is necessary to support a programs curriculum. Nursing programs are accredited by various bodies, yet each accrediting body expects the nursing program to evaluate itself to ensure the students are meeting the program outcomes. The purpose of this project is to develop the process for Registered Nurses Baccalaureate of Science in Nursing (RN-BSN) program assessment through mapping of key assignments to program outcomes and assessment rubrics development to demonstrate student achievement of program outcomes. Faculty use of assessment rubrics will determine student learning and achievement of program outcomes. Context The University of Southern Indiana on-line RN-BSN program has six program outcomes. While regulatory bodies look at prelicensure programs and NCLEX pass rates, it is also essential to evaluate the effectiveness of RN-BSN programs. There was no clear data to demonstrate achieve of program outcomes. Licensed RNs are required to complete nine nursing courses. Specific courses assignments were identified with key evidence to demonstrate the students achievement of program outcomes. Grounding A search of literature using three online databases revealed limited published research related to nursing program evaluation. Literature reviews reveal much of the published evaluation research focuses on evaluation of individual courses or instructional methods rather than systematic program evaluation (Horne & Sandmann, 2012; Russell, 2015). Research related to use of rubrics in program evaluation focused on interrater reliability for grading individual student written assignments (Kilanowski & Bowers, 2017), mapping competencies to course assignments (Laux & Stoten, 2016). The lack of overall program evaluation research supports the need for study and development of effective processes for documentation of outcomes and program evaluation. Approach The project was submitted for Institutional Review Board for approval. The project was identified as a quality improvement project. Two workshops were conducted in May 2019. Day 1 was to examine the courses for key assignments and identify evidence that would demonstrate achievement of program outcomes. Day 2 was the development of the assessment rubrics with the assistance of an Assessment Consultant. Assessment rubrics were piloted in six classes in Summer 2019. Face validity of assessment rubrics were determined by two faculty not participating in the workshop. Assessment rubrics were revised based on the comments from the faculty reviewers and will be piloted in additional courses. Reflection/Discussion/Lessons Learned The piloting of the rubrics by faculty identified concerns with the provision of evidence needed to demonstrate achievement of program outcomes. The face validity reviewers provided vital feedback and suggestion on how to modify the assessment rubric ensure the measurement of identified outcomes. Assessment rubrics were revised based on feedback from the faculty participating in the pilot and face validity reviewers. Face validity review and discussion provided clarity on how the assessment rubrics needed to be modified to demonstrate the evidence of students achieving program outcomes. This was a collaborative effort between the faculty of the RN-BSN program. The face validity reviewers taught outside of the RN-BSN program. Measurement of student learning and achievement of program outcomes will begin Summer 2020. References Horne, E. M. & Sandmann, L. R. (2012). Current trends in systematic program evaluation of online graduate nursing education: An integrative literature review. Journal of Nursing Education, 51, 570-578. https://doi.org/10.3928/01484834-20120820-06 Kilanowski, J. F. & Abbott, M. B. (2017). Investigating interrater reliability in an online RN-to-BSN program: Disparate conclusions. Journal of Nursing Education, 56, 360-363. https://doi.org/10.3928/01484834-20170518-08 Laux, M. & Stoten, S. (2016). A statewide RN-BSN consortium use of the electronic portfolio to demonstrate student competency. Nurse Educator, 41, 275-277. https://doi.org/10.1097/NNE.0000000000000277 Russell, B. H. (2015). The who, what, and how of evaluation within online nursing education: State of the science. Journal of Nursing Education, 54, 13-21+sup. https://doi.org/10.3928/01484834-20141228-02
    • Enhancement of Exam Preparation Skills

      Connerton, Charlotte; Bonhotal, Susan; Krieg, Sue
      Problem Statement: Does exam feedback by the faculty change the study habits and life choices of the students to be successful on an exam? Faculty feedback on exams has been identified to increase engagement and help students to verbalize their thought processes, analyze their performance on exams, and adjust study strategies to improve learning. Context: First semester baccalaureate nursing in two introductory nursing courses at a public university are completing “exam wrappers” after each exam. The students will be able to identify and reflect on exam preparation. Approach: The faculty used “exam wrappers” to collect data following each exam. An “exam wrapper” is a group of questions at the end of an exam which identify student study habits and life choices (i.e. study preparation, number of hours worked, and number of hours of sleep) prior to an exam. Using “exam wrappers” and exam scores, faculty were able to identify those students that struggled to pass exams. Once the student was identified, faculty reached out to discuss results and counsel on study habits and life choices. Faculty used a checklist which included: attendance at the meeting, review of “exam wrappers,” review of exam questions, test taking strategies, discussion of exam preparedness, and a referral to peer tutoring. Students who passed the exams were able to identify and reflect on exam preparedness. Results: Faculty consultation with the students improved the exam preparedness and exam scores. Discussion: Faculty learned that all students benefit from identification and reflection of exam preparation. “Exam wrappers” could be an additional tool for faculty to increase student engagement and motivation.
    • Nursing Student Led CPR Training for High School Students

      Hunt, Jean; St. Clair, Julie; Connerton, Charlotte
      In 2014, House Bill 1202, authored by Representative Ron Bacon, became law.  This bill mandated that high school students receive instruction in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and the use of an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) prior to graduation.  The University of Southern Indiana nursing program partnered with the Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation (EVSC) to meet this requirement.  The EVSC purchased the ‘CPR in Schools’ program which includes a video, handouts, and simple, lightweight manikins.  Hands-Only CPR was the method chosen to teach to the high school students.  This course eliminates mouth-to-mouth ventilation making it simple and increasing the likelihood that rescuers will come to the aid of a cardiopulmonary arrest victim.  Nursing students enrolled in the Population Focused Nursing Practice course received training in teaching “Hands-Only CPR.”   This activity integrates service learning with the practice of teaching.  Evidence has proven that service learning is an educational practice which strengthens integration of key course objectives, improves student understanding of community and social issues, and influences the initiation of civic action.  In 2008 the University of Southern Indiana received recognition and was classified as a Community Engagement University by the  Carnegie Foundation.  This recognition is used in self-assessment and quality improvement by the university and is reassessed by the Carnegie Foundation on a five year cycle. Community engagement is defined by the foundation as collaboration between institutions of higher education and their larger communities for the mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge and resources in a context of partnership and reciprocity.    Since 2015, USI nursing students have taught nearly 3500 high school students how to perform “Hands-Only CPR.” In a study conducted during the EVSC school year 2016-2017, 25 USI nursing students taught Hands-Only CPR to local high school students.  Assessment of a before and after perceptions of the nursing students’ teaching event yielded positive results. The results showed significant improvement in the students' perception of their teaching ability to include demonstration of CPR, use of appropriate teaching strategies, and achievement of learning outcomes.  This experience not only provides the student with increased confidence in the important nursing role of teaching but is routinely mentioned on evaluations as a gratifying and a highly valued/favored experience for achieving learning outcomes. The EVSC frequently expresses their gratitude for the assistance provided by the university in providing this life-saving, required education to high school students in our community.
    • Students Enhancing Healthy Eating and Active Living (HEAL) Through Service Learning

      Ramos, Elizabeth; Connerton, Charlotte
      Topic/Problem Statement: Service learning is meaningful community service with instruction and structured reflection to enrich the learning experience and teach civic responsibility. Through service learning, the NUTR 383 students enhanced the HEAL curriculum and met course learning outcomes by applying and sharing food and nutrition principles that promote and encourage simple food and nutrient choices among the HEAL participants. The students reflected on their learning to connect theory to practice while the HEAL participants expressed reciprocal benefits to help enhance their healthy food choices.  Context: Nutrition 383 Practical Applications and Evaluation of Food Preparation and Nutrition is a required spring practical food science offering for Nutrition and Wellness and Foodservice Management majors. The HEAL (Healthy Eating and Active Living) program is a grant funded endeavor that promotes healthy lifestyle changes in a church group, specifically All Saints Catholic Parish in Evansville. Students in NUTR 383 and participants in the HEAL program connected in this innovative learning process by constructing, discussing, sharing, and using these materials to make simple healthy food choices. Approach: Students worked individually on each assigned application after laboratory instruction. Through the applications, students creatively developed printed materials in four application / assignment sets. These sets included weekly dinner and snack menus, Dietary Guidelines and recommendations, suggestions for low cost foods, Nutrition Facts panel interpretation with focus on health claims, and nutrient connections to color choices of fruits and vegetables. The students also submitted recipes, which were assembled into a cookbook for individuals / families and quantity food service management. Each student created two recipes: One with enhanced vegetables (hiding a vegetable within another vegetable) and another with replacement of salt with flavor, herbs, and spices for a bean (legume) soup.  This recipe allowed students to show how to promote health and reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, osteoporosis, obesity, cancer, and dental caries. Reflection/Discussion: Both the nutrition students and the HEAL participants benefited from the service learning application and the project cookbook. Students were able to plan menus, create recipes, and provide nutritional values for educational materials for the HEAL participants. Through reflection the students stated, “I enjoy and value the engaging hands on experience application that broaden my learning capabilities; and "I feel like it was a review of previous things that have been taught in other classes which is nice." The HEAL participants were very appreciative to receive the supplemental information. References: Brinkman, P. & Syracuse, C. (n.d.). Modifying a recipe to be healthier. The Ohio State Extension Family and Consumer Science Bulletin HYG-5543-06. Evers, W., & Mason, A. (2001). Altering recipes for better health. Purdue Extension Consumer and Family Sciences Bulletin CFS-157-W. McGee, H. (2004). On food and cooking. New York, NY: Scribner. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2018). 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (8th ed.). Retrieved from https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/resources/2015-2020_Dietary_Guidelines.pdf 
    • Using a Mix of Strategies to Prepare Nursing Students for Disaster Response

      Connerton, Charlotte; St. Clair, Julie
      Undergraduate nursing faculty are expected to prepare students to participate as members and leaders of interprofessional teams that provide emergency services in their communities.  The BSN Essentials indicate that the baccalaureate nursing program must prepare graduates to “use clinical judgment and decision-making skills in appropriate, timely nursing care during disaster, mass casualty, and other emergency situations” (The American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2008, p. 25).  Context: Nursing 455:  Population-Focused Nursing Practice is taken Fall semester of the senior year. The course promotes development of disaster preparedness competencies through seminar, online clinical modules and simulation. Students are expected to apply principles of SALT triage, plan and set up a shelter, conduct a shelter guest intake and health needs assessment, and use the medical evacuation sled in a seminar setting on campus. Approach: The disaster preparedness clinical education includes seminar, independent online learning and simulation.  The clinical activities include the following: Completion of the SALT Triage and the FEMA IS-100 course independently online prior to the seminar day. Completion of “Stop the Bleed” which includes skills demonstration of wound packing and tourniquet application. Demonstration of evacuation of a victim down a staircase using a Med Sled. Tour of the Physical Activities Center (a Red Cross designated shelter) and development of a shelter set up plans. Use of case studies with Red Cross shelter forms. Demonstration of triage competency using patient triage training cards. Reflection/Discussion: A mix of educational strategies was used to prepare senior level nursing students for response during a disaster.  Students demonstrated the ability to apply the principles of SALT triage, plan and set up a shelter, conduct a shelter guest intake and health needs assessments, and use the medical evacuation sled. Students were actively engaged, and learning occurred through the simulation. References: American Association of Colleges of Nursing (2008). The essentials of baccalaureate education for professional nursing practice. Retrieved from http://www.aacnnursing.org/Portals/42/Publications/BaccEssentials08.pdf American College of Surgeons (2015-2016). Stop the bleed. Retrieved from http://www.bleedingcontrol.org/ Federal Emergency Management Agency. (2018). IS-100.C: Introduction to the incident command system, ICS 100. Retrieved from https://training.fema.gov/is/courseoverview.aspx?code=IS-100.c MESH Coalition (n.d.). Adult patient triage cards. Retrieved from http://www.meshcoalition.org/products/patient-triagecards National Disaster Life Support Foundation (2015). SALT mass casualty triage on-line training. Retrieved from http://register2.ndlsf.org/mod/page/view.php?id=2056