• Same-Day Dental Procedures with Questions Requiring Immediate Responses: An IPE Assignment

      Hall, Mellissa; Coan, Lorinda; Holt, Emily
      Research Question/Context Does an interprofessional assignment support learning between two student groups: Dental Hygiene/Dental Assisting and graduate nursing students in a family nurse practitioner specialty? The interprofessional assignment was developed to simulate a real-life experience using a “patient” waiting for a dental procedure. The goal of the assignment was to emphasize shared patient responsibility between dental and primary care professionals. Clinical scenarios included commonly encountered concerns: uncontrolled diabetes, uncontrolled blood pressure, or daily use of medications associated with bleeding risk. Grounding The theoretical foundation of the assignment was derived from E.E. Bayles’ discussion of theories supporting learning (1966). Bayles’ emphasized five tenets of learning: learning as a mental discipline, learning as conditioning, learning as preparation for life, learning as development of insight, and learning as operant conditioning. The interprofessional assignment focused on the third and fourth tenets as presented by Bayle. Students were assigned commonly presenting patient scenarios they will deal with daily in their professional lives. With the patient scenario, students were led to develop insight on how to ask or provide answers supported by current literature/standards of patient care. Methods An interprofessional site was opened through the Blackboard Learning Management System for both dental hygiene/assistant students and graduate nursing students. IRB ruling was received from the University of Southern Indiana. The Blackboard site provided details about the assignment for both student groups and explained informed consent. Students could opt out of the study, but all were required to complete the assignment. The pre/post questionnaires focused on the value of the IPE assignment (King, Shaw, Orchard & Miller, 2010). Data from pre and post questionnaires were compared to determine the effectiveness of the assignment. Pre-IPE assignment responses (N = 71) and post-IPE responses (N = 50) were compared. Discussion/Lessons Learned Pre and post student surveys included quantitative and qualitative questions. Findings from the quantitative questions supported > 98% of students reported the IPE assignment was of value and helped them to understand the other profession’s role in patient care. The majority of both students groups responded the assignment helped understand how classroom content would be applied to their future work setting. Most qualitative responses were positive as well. Other disciplines could adapt a similar IPE assignment based upon anticipated collaboration between professions and the necessity for timely answers to assure patients/customers receive appropriate and timely services. References Bayles, E. (1966). Theories of Learning and Classroom Methods. Theory Into Practice, 5(2), 71-76. King, G., Shaw, L. Orchard, C.A. & Miller, S. (2010). ISVS: The interprofessional socialization and valuing scale: A tool for evaluating the shift toward collaborative care approached in health care settings. Work, 35 (1), 77-85.
    • Structuring Course Delivery Upon Student Evaluation Criteria

      Holt, Emily; Holt, Emily
      Topic: Student perceptions of teaching and evaluation may differ from those of the faculty member teaching the course.  Without dialogue between the students and faculty members, perceptions of effective and ineffective teaching may be unaddressed. This may impair successful outcomes in the course. Context: Dental hygiene students enter the program as a cohort and take the same courses together for 4 semesters.  Since the cohort remains the same for the 23 courses taken while in the Dental Hygiene Program, faculty members can implement similar approaches to teaching and evaluation throughout the 2 years to address student perceptions of effective teaching and evaluation methods. Approach: Before the class session, a framework is created in Microsoft Word which the faculty member uses during the class session to type student feedback while the document is pulled up on the projector.  Fifty minutes is dedicated to open conversation with students to understand what they consider effective and ineffective methods to address five of the ten statements found on the University sponsored course evaluation.  The statements include: The course materials used, such as visuals, texts, handouts, and online items, helped me to learn. The assignments helped me increase my understanding of the course content. The instructor clearly communicated the subject matter. The instructor's teaching style was effective for me. The instructor evaluated me fairly. Following the class session, the faculty member reviews the feedback to determine if she already implements the suggestion, already prevents the problem described, will sometimes implement the suggestion, will work on implementing the suggestion more often, or is unable to implement the suggestion.  A symbol key representing each of the five actions is placed next to each item on the framework sheet.  The document is emailed to students so they know how the faculty member will incorporate their suggestions.  Ten to 15 minutes is spent at the beginning of the next class session to answer questions students have about the results. Reflection: Students tell me they feel like I listen to them and meet their needs.  I better understand what it means to a student to teach and evaluate effectively.  Ultimately, student evaluations of teaching have improved as a result of addressing their preferences in teaching and evaluation.