• Does What Students Believe Predict How Well They Evaluate Arguments?

      Dandotkar, Srikanth; Griggs, Shelby
      Abstract is not included by request of the authors.  Please contact the authors for additional information. References Bendixen, L. D., & Rule, D. C. (2004). An integrative approach to personal epistemology: A guiding model. Educational Psychologist, 39, 69–80. Britt, M. A., Kurby, C. A., Dandotkar, S., & Wolfe, C. R. (2008). I agreed with what? Memory for simple argument claims. Discourse Processes, 45(1), 52–84. Dandotkar, S., Magliano, J. P., & Britt, M. A. (2016). Effect Logical Relatedness and Semantic Overlap on Argument Evaluation. Discourse Processes, 53(7), 581-602. Ferguson, L.E., Bråten, I., Strømsø, H.I., & Anmarkrud, Ø. (2013). Epistemic beliefs and comprehension in the context of reading multiple documents: Examining the role of conflict. International Journal of Educational Research, 62, 100-114. Hofer, B. K., & Pintrich, P. R. (Eds.). (2002). Personal epistemology: The psychology of beliefs about knowledge and knowing. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. Schommer-Aikins, M., Duell, O. K., & Hutter, R. (2005). Epistemological Beliefs, Mathematical Problem-solving Beliefs, and Academic Performance of Medical School Students. The Elementary School Journal, 105 (3).289 - 304. Wood, P. K., & Kardash, C. A. (2002). Critical elements in the design and analysis of studies of epistemology. In B. K. Hofer & P. R. Pintrich (Eds.) Personal epistemology: The psychology of beliefs about knowledge and knowing (pp. 231-260). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.