• Occupational Therapy/Respiratory Therapy Collaboration: Understanding Roles and Early Mobility Simulation

      Mason, Jessica; Arvin, Mary Kay; Delp, Jody; Morgan, Julie; Phy, Wesley; Mason, Jessica; Arvin, Mary Kay; Delp, Jody; Morgan, Julie; Phy, Wesley
      Topic/Problem Statement: Students enrolled in healthcare programs must learn to work collaboratively to best serve patients. Outside of one’s own profession, roles of additional team members may not be clearly understood. Occupational and respiratory therapists work collaboratively as part of early mobility teams in intensive care units. Students of identified programs need to learn each other’s roles and purpose to best work collaboratively within these teams. They must also learn to communicate effectively to ensure patient safety. Context: Occupational therapy students and respiratory students both presented on their roles and scope of practice to the other discipline. Additionally, handouts were created to aid each discipline in the practice of early mobility. Following the presentations, the students completed two early mobility simulation activities. From this experience, student outcomes involved role and scope of practice recognition, the benefits of interprofessional peer teaching, and identifying the components of interprofessional collaboration and teamwork. Approach: The occupational therapy profession will need to focus on interprofessional education in the classroom to be better prepared for evolving healthcare reform impacted by emerging areas of practice within the profession (Mroz, Pitonyak, Fogelberg, & Leland, 2015). The Institute of Medicine (2003) endorsed peer-to-peer teaching to better improve healthcare quality (Buring et al., 2009). The occupational therapy students presented to the respiratory therapy students the role of occupational therapy, importance of functional and early mobility, and how to perform a stand-pivot transfer. Next, respiratory therapy students presented the role of respiratory therapy, an overview of different types of oxygen equipment, and knowledge of oxygen parameters. All students then participated in two interprofessional simulation activities requiring teamwork to transfer a patient safely while maintaining all necessary equipment, monitoring vital signs, and assessing the patient appropriately. Reflection/Discussion: At the end of the simulation, students debriefed with occupational and respiratory therapy faculty and the standardized patient. Students voiced a better understanding of one another’s roles and scope of practice. They emphasized the need for teamwork and communication when working with any patient. Many students voiced learning from the other discipline during both the presentation and simulation. The students were asked to participate in a survey at the end of the debriefing focused on the peer teaching experience. Results indicate most students agreed the interprofessional activity will help with their therapy role in the future, was time and effort well spent, and that each discipline has a responsibility to teach others. Faculty plan to continue the interprofessional activity in the future. References: Buring, S. M., Bhushan, A., Broeseker, A., Conway, S., Duncan-Hewitt, W., Hansen, L., & Westberg, S. (2009). Interprofessional education: Definitions, student competencies, and guidelines for implementation. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 73(4), article 59. Mroz, T.M., Pitonyak, J.S., Fogelberg, D., & Leland, N.E. (2015). Health policy perspectives – Client centeredness and health reform: Key issues for occupational therapy. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69, 6905090010.  Retrieved from http://ajot.aota.org/article.aspx?articleid=2436567  
    • Opening the Academic Gates: Using Threshold Concepts of Writing Studies as a Framework for Entering a Discipline

      Hanson, Morgan; Hanson, Morgan
      Topic/Problem Statement: Current theories on student learning express the inherent struggle with learning that students encounter when engaging with a new discipline in the university. One way to help students work through the troublesomeness that comes with learning about a new discipline is via threshold concepts, a framework first introduced by Jan H. F. Meyer and Ray Land (2003). In this poster presentation, I provide strategies for integrating threshold concepts of writing studies into course writing assignments (informal and formal) to increase participation in academic discourse and academic literacy and to minimize disciplinary gatekeeping. Context: I focus this presentation on a first-year composition (FYC) course (in this case, ENG 201), a Core 39 writing course at USI. I also study the English department’s program objectives for ENG 201 and Core 39 assessment rubric(s) to demonstrate how threshold concepts can further articulate the goals of the department and the university, thus enabling students to more effectively engage within USI’s academic community. Approach: In 2015, Linda Adler-Kassner and Elizabeth Wardle, along with other writing studies scholars, established threshold concepts for writing in Naming What We Know: Threshold Concepts of Writing Studies (NWWK). Building on the work of Jan H. F. Meyer and Ray Land (2003), Adler-Kassner and Wardle define threshold concepts as “concepts critical for continued learning and participation in an area or within a community of practice” (2). In this project, I take threshold concepts from NWWK, and I integrate them into formal and informal writing assignments to provide students with a more accessible way to work with key ideas in the field and departmental and university objectives. I provide strategies for creating reading responses that emphasize reflection on course content via a threshold concepts lens. I also demonstrate ways to include threshold concepts into major writing assignments to meet departmental and university goals for the course. Reflection/Discussion: Threshold concepts, with their accessible interpretations of major disciplinary knowledge, create a bridge for students to cross over the murky waters of entering into a new discipline.Through this approach, students gain confidence in writing and academic discourse and literacy, which allows them to ease into the work of the university. Moreover, students gain a new way to talk about writing, which can be used in other courses. To that end, then, instructors can take threshold concepts of writing studies and incorporate them into their own courses. Works Cited: Adler-Kassner, Linda, and Elizabeth Wardle, editors. Naming What We Know: Threshold Concepts of Writing Studies. Utah State UP, 2015. Meyer, Jan H. F., and Ray Land. Threshold Concepts and Troublesome Knowledge: Linkages to Ways of Thinking and Practising within the Disciplines. Occasional Report 4. Edinburgh: University of Edinburgh, 2003. ETL Project, www.etl.tla.ed.ac.uk/docs/ETLreport4.pdf.  Accessed 25 July 2017.
    • Shaping a collaborative model of food services and public health: A multipronged approach using interprofessional education

      Nimkar, Swateja; Ramos, Elizabeth; Borowiecki, Chris; Nimkar, Swateja; Ramos, Elizabeth; Borowiecki, Chris
      Topic: The purpose of this interprofessional education (IPE) project was to introduce and encourage collaborative learning across the two professions of public health and food service management using community expertise. The intended learning outcomes for students were improved communication, collaboration, and conflict resolution skills. Additionally, students were also expected to identify and negotiate specific roles and responsibilities while working with members of another profession. Context: The project was conceptualized by two faculty from Food and Nutrition, and Health Services programs at the University of Southern Indiana (USI). Undergraduate students and faculty from Quantity Food Production and Purchasing and Public Health courses collaborated with the Vanderburgh County Health Department (VCHD) to ensure best food safety and sanitation practice in a real world environment. Approach: The faculty partnered with VCHD to provide students with the training and resources related to food safety and public health issues in the area of commercial and quantity food production. Quantity food students were ServSafe certified and public health students study food safety topics for this project while engaging in five IPE activities spread out during one academic semester at the College of Nursing and Health Professions (CNHP). Following the initial meetings and education sessions, students engaged in a final project, where public health students served as food safety inspectors as quantity foods students prepared elaborate cultural meals offered to members from the campus community. Finally, students conducted a debate on food safety issues as a culminating experience for the IPE project. Reflection and Discussion: Through this inter-professional collaboration, public health students learned the various aspects of reducing risk for foodborne illnesses and quantity foods production students experienced using Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) plans to maintain food safety while preparing cultural meals. Both groups utilized an audit system that was discussed in advance by them to identify, analyze, and minimize hazards associated with foodborne illnesses. This project was conducted with direct supervision from faculty teaching the two classes. Thus, faculty and students are using IPE as an innovative approach to develop critical work skills among the future generations of food service and public health workers. References: Brown, A. (2019). Understanding Food: Principles and Preparation (6th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage. National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. (2017). ServSafe Coursebook (7th ed.). Chicago, IL: National Restaurant Association. Riegelman, R., & Kirkwood, B. (2014). Public Health 101: Healthy People-Healthy Populations (2nd ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning. 
    • Structuring Course Delivery Upon Student Evaluation Criteria

      Holt, Emily; Holt, Emily
      Topic: Student perceptions of teaching and evaluation may differ from those of the faculty member teaching the course.  Without dialogue between the students and faculty members, perceptions of effective and ineffective teaching may be unaddressed. This may impair successful outcomes in the course. Context: Dental hygiene students enter the program as a cohort and take the same courses together for 4 semesters.  Since the cohort remains the same for the 23 courses taken while in the Dental Hygiene Program, faculty members can implement similar approaches to teaching and evaluation throughout the 2 years to address student perceptions of effective teaching and evaluation methods. Approach: Before the class session, a framework is created in Microsoft Word which the faculty member uses during the class session to type student feedback while the document is pulled up on the projector.  Fifty minutes is dedicated to open conversation with students to understand what they consider effective and ineffective methods to address five of the ten statements found on the University sponsored course evaluation.  The statements include: The course materials used, such as visuals, texts, handouts, and online items, helped me to learn. The assignments helped me increase my understanding of the course content. The instructor clearly communicated the subject matter. The instructor's teaching style was effective for me. The instructor evaluated me fairly. Following the class session, the faculty member reviews the feedback to determine if she already implements the suggestion, already prevents the problem described, will sometimes implement the suggestion, will work on implementing the suggestion more often, or is unable to implement the suggestion.  A symbol key representing each of the five actions is placed next to each item on the framework sheet.  The document is emailed to students so they know how the faculty member will incorporate their suggestions.  Ten to 15 minutes is spent at the beginning of the next class session to answer questions students have about the results. Reflection: Students tell me they feel like I listen to them and meet their needs.  I better understand what it means to a student to teach and evaluate effectively.  Ultimately, student evaluations of teaching have improved as a result of addressing their preferences in teaching and evaluation.  
    • Student Perceptions of a Low-Tech Option for Engagement and Assessment

      Schmuck, Heather; Cook, Joy; Schmuck, Heather; Cook, Joy
      The focus for the IRB approved study was to explore whether utilizing a simple ‘low-tech’, inexpensive option in the classroom provided higher perception levels of engagement and assessment (average rating of agree or strongly agree) from both the student and faculty perspective. The research question for this study was ‘What are students’ perceptions regarding the use of dry erase whiteboards in the classroom as it relates to engagement, formative assessment and learning?’. There is ample literature supporting the use of high-tech ‘clickers’ or student owned technology to increase student engagement. Oftentimes, these high-tech options require increased cost burden on the student. Low-tech options can be relatively inexpensive and potentially create a similar engaged environment demonstrated in literature without additional financial burden. Small dry erase whiteboards were used by students in multiple imaging science classrooms to answer course review material during lecture delivery. Two cohorts of students utilizing this method were surveyed over assessment, engagement, and learning with Likert scaled items and open-ended questions. The researchers learned that this low-cost, low-tech method of student assessment was well received by students who were in overall agreement with every surveyed item. Faculty perceptions for the study included positive results including active engagement from all rather than a few students. Statistical analysis demonstrated a strong correlation between two survey items related to student assessment indicating that students perceived a positive benefit from the use of this teaching pedagogy related to self-reflection. A suggestion for future research would include measurement of actual student learning outcomes when employing this pedagogical practice rather than just perceived learning and a comparative analysis between this option and other ‘high-tech’, more expensive options.
    • Students Enhancing Healthy Eating and Active Living (HEAL) Through Service Learning

      Ramos, Elizabeth; Connerton, Charlotte
      Topic/Problem Statement: Service learning is meaningful community service with instruction and structured reflection to enrich the learning experience and teach civic responsibility. Through service learning, the NUTR 383 students enhanced the HEAL curriculum and met course learning outcomes by applying and sharing food and nutrition principles that promote and encourage simple food and nutrient choices among the HEAL participants. The students reflected on their learning to connect theory to practice while the HEAL participants expressed reciprocal benefits to help enhance their healthy food choices.  Context: Nutrition 383 Practical Applications and Evaluation of Food Preparation and Nutrition is a required spring practical food science offering for Nutrition and Wellness and Foodservice Management majors. The HEAL (Healthy Eating and Active Living) program is a grant funded endeavor that promotes healthy lifestyle changes in a church group, specifically All Saints Catholic Parish in Evansville. Students in NUTR 383 and participants in the HEAL program connected in this innovative learning process by constructing, discussing, sharing, and using these materials to make simple healthy food choices. Approach: Students worked individually on each assigned application after laboratory instruction. Through the applications, students creatively developed printed materials in four application / assignment sets. These sets included weekly dinner and snack menus, Dietary Guidelines and recommendations, suggestions for low cost foods, Nutrition Facts panel interpretation with focus on health claims, and nutrient connections to color choices of fruits and vegetables. The students also submitted recipes, which were assembled into a cookbook for individuals / families and quantity food service management. Each student created two recipes: One with enhanced vegetables (hiding a vegetable within another vegetable) and another with replacement of salt with flavor, herbs, and spices for a bean (legume) soup.  This recipe allowed students to show how to promote health and reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, osteoporosis, obesity, cancer, and dental caries. Reflection/Discussion: Both the nutrition students and the HEAL participants benefited from the service learning application and the project cookbook. Students were able to plan menus, create recipes, and provide nutritional values for educational materials for the HEAL participants. Through reflection the students stated, “I enjoy and value the engaging hands on experience application that broaden my learning capabilities; and "I feel like it was a review of previous things that have been taught in other classes which is nice." The HEAL participants were very appreciative to receive the supplemental information. References: Brinkman, P. & Syracuse, C. (n.d.). Modifying a recipe to be healthier. The Ohio State Extension Family and Consumer Science Bulletin HYG-5543-06. Evers, W., & Mason, A. (2001). Altering recipes for better health. Purdue Extension Consumer and Family Sciences Bulletin CFS-157-W. McGee, H. (2004). On food and cooking. New York, NY: Scribner. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2018). 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (8th ed.). Retrieved from https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/resources/2015-2020_Dietary_Guidelines.pdf 
    • Survey of Dental Hygiene and Occupational Therapy Students' Perceptions of Team Behaviors and Client Satisfaction during an Interprofessional Education Event

      Coan, Lorinda; Arvin, Mary Kay; Reynolds, Erin
      Oral hygiene is an aspect of daily self-care that has a significant connection to overall health. There is a direct connection between the condition of the mouth, the condition of other systems in the body, and the transmission of infection throughout the body (Azarpazhooh & Leake, 2006; Li, Kolltveit, Tronstad, & Olsen, 2000; Sloane et al., 2013; Stein & Henry, 2009). Daily oral hygiene to maintain oral health has direct benefits for older adults (Bissett & Preshaw, 2011; U.S. Department of Health, 2011). In contrast, a poor oral hygiene regimen is associated with serious risks to overall health, especially in older adults who have been already diagnosed with certain medical conditions and are at risk for health complications (Azarpazhooh & Leake 2006; Li et al., 2000; Salamone, 2013; Stein & Henry, 2009). As patients age and experience a declining health status that leads them into long term care (LTC), oral hygiene tends to receive less attention than other activities of daily living (ADL) (McNally et al., 2012). Occupational therapy (OT) practitioners and dental hygienists (DH) share similar goals in the effort to improve oral healthcare in all populations. Shared assessments include both cognitive and physiological performance skills. Through a collaborative service learning activity, OT and DH students demonstrated interprofessional skills while performing oral and upper body screening of adult clients from the. Survey results indicate positive student perceptions of team planning, as well as high patient (adult volunteer) satisfaction in the care provided.
    • The impact of class delivery mode on student-faculty interaction and mastery goal orientation

      Celuch, Kevin; Milewicz, Chad; Saxby, Carl
      Topic/Problem statement:  A host of literature points to the significance of active/collaborative learning as a means of enhancing student engagement and subsequent learning.  Recently, questions have been raised as to the efficacy of the approach for different learning contexts (face-to-face versus online).  The present research explores the following question: how does class delivery mode influence the efficacy of active/collaborative learning?  Specifically, we examine perceived differences across delivery modes as well as if the effect of class delivery mode works through (is mediated by) perceived student-faculty interaction to influence student mastery goal orientation. Context:  Students completed a questionnaire related to their perceptions of the classes and their learning at the end of four classes: two sections of a marketing principles introductory class (one face-to-face and one online) taught by the same instructor using the same class assignments; and two sections of a marketing management capstone class (one face-to-face and one online) taught by the same instructor using the same class assignments. Approach:  Note that we controlled for instructor, assignments, and level of classes.  The literature often critiques comparisons of face-to-face versus online class formats for a failure to control such factors.   This research also measures important student process perceptions identified in the teaching and learning literature which have been tied to the effectiveness of active/collaborative approaches.  These included: perceived student-faculty interaction which assesses instructor provision of feedback and facilitation of discussion (adopted from Carini, Kuh, and Klein 2006); mastery goal orientation which assesses the extent of emphasis on understanding rather than memorizing content, enjoyment of learning, and performance improvement (adapted from Anderman and Midgley 2002; Church, Elliot, and Gable 2001); and perceived student engagement which assesses student perceptions of the class learning environment (adopted from Church, Elliot, and Gable 2001).  Reflection/Discussion:  Significant differences between the face-to-face and online delivery mode were observed with face-to-face classes having stronger perceived student-faculty interaction and mastery goal orientation than online formats.  Interestingly, both delivery modes were equally engaging.  Further, class delivery mode (face-to-face versus online) was a significant predictor of perceived student-faculty interaction.  Lastly, delivery mode was found to work through student-faculty interaction to influence student mastery goal orientation.  These findings hold implications for adapting and strengthening active/collaborative learning to online delivery.  Specifically, there is a need to explore at a more nuanced level how the perception of student-faculty interaction can be enhanced for online delivery to positively influence student mastery goal orientation which has been tied to deeper, longer lasting learning.  References Anderman, E.M. and Midgley, C. (2002), “Methods for studing goals, goal structures, and patterns of adaptive learning”, in Goals, Goal Structures, and Patterns of Adaptive Learning, ed. C. Midgley, pp. 1-53.Erlbaum, Mahwah, NJ. Carini, R.M., Kuh, G.D. and Klein, S.P. (2006), “Student engagement and student learning: Testing the linkages”, Research in Higher Education, Vol. 47 No. 1, 1-32. Church, M.A., Elliot, A.J. and Gable, S.L. (2001), “Perceptions of classroom environment, achievement goals, and achievement outcomes”, Journal of Educational Psychology, Vol.93 No. 1, 43-54.
    • Training improves student performance and perceptions in small group learning

      Hopper, Mari K.; Gidley, Patrick; Mann, Daniel; Weinzapfel, Jacob
      Fifty percent of course contact time in the “renewed” curriculum at Indiana University School of Medicine (IUSM) was dedicated to non-didactic, small-group learning. End of course evaluations indicated that students did not understand or value the approach, perhaps due to lack of training in this methodology. Our aim was to determine if engaging students in training designed to enhance small group dynamics and explain outcomes of this approach would result in improved small group performance and enhanced perceptions. Following IRB approval, small-group case-based sessions were audiotaped on two occasions prior to training (Pre), and two additional sessions following training (Post). Recordings were evaluated and scored by trained evaluators using a rubric including the following categories: Participation, Shared Roles, Focus on Learning Objectives, Approach, Independent Thinking and Interpersonal Interaction. Scores for each category were averaged across the three evaluators both Pre and Post. Additionally, to assess student perceptions, a 15-question survey was administered at three time periods: 1) before any small group sessions or training; 2) after recording two small group sessions and directly prior to training; and 3) following training and after recording two additional sessions. Survey questions included topics such as personal preparation, interpersonal interactions, prior undergraduate experience, and perceptions of small group as an effective learning strategy. Question responses were based on a Likert scale of one through seven. Although work is ongoing, preliminary data analysis using paired T-tests indicate that participation scores increased following training, with members participating more equally and encouraging input from each other more frequently. There was little change in rubric scores for other criteria including ability to share roles and addressing learning objectives. Survey responses reveal that students enjoy small group sessions more, contribute more equally, and have fewer tangential discussions in comparison to the pre-training survey responses. These data suggest that students participating in small group learning sessions benefit from training in this approach, and such training will enhance student perceptions regarding effectiveness of this learning strategy.
    • Understanding Retention Pathways and Bottlenecks of STEM Majors: Implications for Student Success

      Elliot, William S.; Deligkaris, Christos; Greenwood, Eric S.; Gentle, Adrian P.; Chan Hilton, Amy B.; Blunt, Shelly B.
      The goals of this project are to increase faculty member's knowledge about evidence-based student retention, instructional best practices, and understanding bottlenecks and other factors impeding student progress in STEM at University of Southern Indiana (USI). In particular, hands-on experiences through group work and engaging students with early undergraduate research contribute significantly to student learning. To accomplish these goals, a working group consisting of faculty members from across the Pott College of Science, Engineering, and Education initiated discussions in Fall 2017 to examine retention factors and bottlenecks. In order to support these activities, the working group secured an Innovation Grant through the Pott College with the goal of developing individualized projects focusing on increasing retention of STEM majors and improving student learning. To assist with our shared efforts, reference materials are made available through SharePoint, Trello is used to document developing hypotheses and activities of the working group, and in-person meetings are held at least once a month to discuss the readings and to share updates on individualized projects. Initially, a systems map was created by the working group to analyze retention pathways of STEM majors at USI. Systems thinking is an effective way to understand the complexity of a topic, identify links among themes, and discover potential individualized research directions. Each working group member then created their own systems map to better constrain their specific area of interest. Research projects that originated from this process include: (1) comparing student attitudes towards group work implementations in introductory Physics courses; (2) evaluating the effectiveness of Pre-Calculus as a preparation for college-level Calculus; (3) exploring the impact of course repeats on student success in the Pott College; (4) increasing retention rates of STEM majors through an early undergraduate research program; and (5) using a faculty learning community and systems mapping to engage faculty members with pedagogical research. Selected student learning outcomes of these projects include: (1) improved comprehension and problem solving skills through group work and active learning, and (2) enriched student engagement through early undergraduate research. Furthermore, faculty members supported one another through the process of Institutional Research Board (IRB) training, the IRB approval process, and securing student data from the Office of Planning, Research, and Assessment. The results from this project will support longer-term retention initiatives and inform strategies to improve student success and retention of STEM majors in the Pott College at USI. In addition, these projects will better position the Pott College to seek external funding (such as National Science Foundation S-STEM program or Howard Hughes Medical Institute Inclusive Excellence program) to support student retention efforts. Finally, classroom strategies that result in improved student learning will be expanded to other sections of introductory courses in mathematics and physics.
    • USI OT/OTA Toy Accessibility Project

      Mason, Jessica; Dishman, Karen; Arvin, Mary Kay
      Topic/Problem Statement: The role of an occupational therapy professional is to ensure that individuals can participate in daily life activities. Play is the work of children. All children grow and develop from play experiences. For some children with disabilities, participation in play can be limited due to physical and/or cognitive deficits. Children with disabilities can utilize switch-operated toys to more easily engage in play. The occupational therapy (OT) and occupational therapy assistant (OTA) programs decided to work together to modify toys for children with disabilities in our community as a service learning activity. Context: Occupational therapy students and occupational therapy assistant students make up the USI Student Occupational Therapy Association (SOTA). The SOTA program applied and received the USI Endeavor Grant in the fall of 2018. The grant was written by two OT students, one OTA student, and two OT faculty members. The funds from the grant will allow students to learn how to adapt battery operated items using switches. Students will be able to use this skill in future professional occupational therapy practice. Approach: According to Hamm (2005), play experiences provide children with practice for skills that they require in adult life. Children learn from interactions with peers through play. The OT and OTA students received education and training on modifying a battery-operated plush toy into a switch operated toy. The process for adapting the toys was provided by the robotics program at Ivy Tech. This process included learning how a simple electrical circuit works, evaluating the toy, splicing together wires, and connecting the switch to the toy.  Toys were presented to the Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation and Easter Seals Rehabilitation Center during December and January. A total of 50 toys were switch adapted by the OT and OTA students. Reflection/Discussion: After the toy adaptation sessions were completed, OT and OTA students were asked to participate in an IRB approved research study regarding the service learning experience.  Results indicated most students believed this activity helped them make a difference and become more aware of the needs in the community. A majority of the OT and OTA students also reported this activity reinforced problem-solving skills and critical thinking.  The OT and OTA students will present the outcomes of the project at the USI Endeavor Symposium in April 2019. References: Hamm, E. M., Mistrett, S. G., & Ruffino, A.G. (2005). Play outcomes and satisfaction with toys and technology of young children with special needs. Journal of Special Education Technology, 21(1), 29-35. Doi:10.1177/016264340602100103 
    • Using a Mix of Strategies to Prepare Nursing Students for Disaster Response

      Connerton, Charlotte; St. Clair, Julie
      Undergraduate nursing faculty are expected to prepare students to participate as members and leaders of interprofessional teams that provide emergency services in their communities.  The BSN Essentials indicate that the baccalaureate nursing program must prepare graduates to “use clinical judgment and decision-making skills in appropriate, timely nursing care during disaster, mass casualty, and other emergency situations” (The American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2008, p. 25).  Context: Nursing 455:  Population-Focused Nursing Practice is taken Fall semester of the senior year. The course promotes development of disaster preparedness competencies through seminar, online clinical modules and simulation. Students are expected to apply principles of SALT triage, plan and set up a shelter, conduct a shelter guest intake and health needs assessment, and use the medical evacuation sled in a seminar setting on campus. Approach: The disaster preparedness clinical education includes seminar, independent online learning and simulation.  The clinical activities include the following: Completion of the SALT Triage and the FEMA IS-100 course independently online prior to the seminar day. Completion of “Stop the Bleed” which includes skills demonstration of wound packing and tourniquet application. Demonstration of evacuation of a victim down a staircase using a Med Sled. Tour of the Physical Activities Center (a Red Cross designated shelter) and development of a shelter set up plans. Use of case studies with Red Cross shelter forms. Demonstration of triage competency using patient triage training cards. Reflection/Discussion: A mix of educational strategies was used to prepare senior level nursing students for response during a disaster.  Students demonstrated the ability to apply the principles of SALT triage, plan and set up a shelter, conduct a shelter guest intake and health needs assessments, and use the medical evacuation sled. Students were actively engaged, and learning occurred through the simulation. References: American Association of Colleges of Nursing (2008). The essentials of baccalaureate education for professional nursing practice. Retrieved from http://www.aacnnursing.org/Portals/42/Publications/BaccEssentials08.pdf American College of Surgeons (2015-2016). Stop the bleed. Retrieved from http://www.bleedingcontrol.org/ Federal Emergency Management Agency. (2018). IS-100.C: Introduction to the incident command system, ICS 100. Retrieved from https://training.fema.gov/is/courseoverview.aspx?code=IS-100.c MESH Coalition (n.d.). Adult patient triage cards. Retrieved from http://www.meshcoalition.org/products/patient-triagecards National Disaster Life Support Foundation (2015). SALT mass casualty triage on-line training. Retrieved from http://register2.ndlsf.org/mod/page/view.php?id=2056
    • Using World Literature to Build Cultural Awareness and Increase Cognitive Flexibility

      Gupta, Sukanya; Popescu-Sandu, Oana
      Abstract is not included by request of the authors. Please contact the authors for additional information.