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dc.contributor.advisorRauscher, Emily A.
dc.contributor.advisorDurham, Wesley T.
dc.contributor.advisorYoung, Stephanie L.
dc.contributor.authorDunn, Erin Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-09T18:13:41Z
dc.date.available2019-12-09T18:13:41Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/305
dc.descriptionThesis available in Rice Library University Archives and Special Collection.
dc.description.abstractResearch has also shown that academic advising plays an important role in student retention, satisfaction, and student success (Allen & Smith, 2008; Drake, 2011; Nadler & Nadler, 1999; Waggenspack & Hensley, 1992). As a result, this relationship deserves a closer look at how communication can affect the relationship between the advisor and advisee. This study looks at different levels of private information shared by the advisor affects student perception of the advisor by measuring credibility, trustworthiness, and student communication satisfaction. Results show students reported higher levels of perceived credibility and trustworthiness of the advisor as well as higher communication satisfaction when advisors shared a low level of private information followed by high levels of private information and finally no disclosure of private information. This goes against much of the previous research conducted on disclosure of private information. Implications and possible explanations of these findings are discussed.
dc.titlePrivacy management in the student-advisor relationship : perceptions of credibility, trust, and communication satisfaction
html.description.abstractResearch has also shown that academic advising plays an important role in student retention, satisfaction, and student success (Allen & Smith, 2008; Drake, 2011; Nadler & Nadler, 1999; Waggenspack & Hensley, 1992). As a result, this relationship deserves a closer look at how communication can affect the relationship between the advisor and advisee. This study looks at different levels of private information shared by the advisor affects student perception of the advisor by measuring credibility, trustworthiness, and student communication satisfaction. Results show students reported higher levels of perceived credibility and trustworthiness of the advisor as well as higher communication satisfaction when advisors shared a low level of private information followed by high levels of private information and finally no disclosure of private information. This goes against much of the previous research conducted on disclosure of private information. Implications and possible explanations of these findings are discussed.
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Arts in Communication
dc.typeThesis (M.A.)--University of Southern Indiana, 2014


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