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dc.contributor.advisorHoward, Leigh Anne
dc.contributor.advisorDurham, Wesley T.
dc.contributor.advisorYoung, Stephanie L.
dc.contributor.authorLowicki, Coralie
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-09T18:13:41Z
dc.date.available2019-12-09T18:13:41Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/306
dc.descriptionThesis available in Rice Library University Archives and Special Collection.
dc.description.abstractThe hijab has drawn social and religious scrutiny, especially in the United States where Islam is not a majority religion. The need for exploring such religious and identity issues has increased as over the past decade the events of the September 11th have fundamentally changed the way the American society perceives Muslims, especially Muslim women who wear the hijab in public settings. The experience of Muslim women in the United States remains unique as they confront numerous stigmas - gender, race, ethnicity, and religion - that are attached to the Islamic dress. The purpose of this thesis research is to explore the personal, social, and political factors that affect Muslim women's decision to wear, or to not wear, the hijab in public settings. These factors combined with identity and stigma theories provide an understanding of how these women negotiate their identity in the U.S. society as Muslim women in the Trump era. This study involves conducting ten in-depth interviews with ten women self-identified as Muslim. Results show that three complications arise when Muslim women consider wearing the hijab in Trump's America: (1) a conflictual opposition between personal and U.S. social standards, (2) their status of Islamic ambassadors, and consequently (3) the backlash related to their choices regarding the hijab.
dc.titleWearing the hijab in Trump's America
html.description.abstractThe hijab has drawn social and religious scrutiny, especially in the United States where Islam is not a majority religion. The need for exploring such religious and identity issues has increased as over the past decade the events of the September 11th have fundamentally changed the way the American society perceives Muslims, especially Muslim women who wear the hijab in public settings. The experience of Muslim women in the United States remains unique as they confront numerous stigmas - gender, race, ethnicity, and religion - that are attached to the Islamic dress. The purpose of this thesis research is to explore the personal, social, and political factors that affect Muslim women's decision to wear, or to not wear, the hijab in public settings. These factors combined with identity and stigma theories provide an understanding of how these women negotiate their identity in the U.S. society as Muslim women in the Trump era. This study involves conducting ten in-depth interviews with ten women self-identified as Muslim. Results show that three complications arise when Muslim women consider wearing the hijab in Trump's America: (1) a conflictual opposition between personal and U.S. social standards, (2) their status of Islamic ambassadors, and consequently (3) the backlash related to their choices regarding the hijab.
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Arts in Communication
dc.typeThesis (M.A.)--University of Southern Indiana, 2018


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