Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorHenning, Zachary T.
dc.contributor.advisorDurham, Wesley T.
dc.contributor.advisorYoung, Stephanie L.
dc.contributor.authorWeigand, Jennifer Mary
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-09T18:13:41Z
dc.date.available2019-12-09T18:13:41Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/311
dc.descriptionThesis available in Rice Library University Archives and Special Collection.
dc.description.abstractA model of job satisfaction is tested through predictive relationships of manager socio-communicative style and job affect in subordinates. Results of the study showed that manager socio-communicative style (specifically, responsiveness) predicts subordinate job affect and that subordinate job affect predicts their own job satisfaction (explaining 38% of the variance). However, the study did not support manager socio-communicative style directly affecting subordinate job satisfaction. This study also examines perceived socio-communicative style of managers based on sex. Results of this part of the study showed that there is no significant difference between the perceived socio-communicative style of managers based on a manager being male or female.
dc.subjectsocio-communicative style
dc.subjectjob affect
dc.subjectjob satisfaction
dc.subjectmanager
dc.subjectsubordinate
dc.titleManager responsiveness : the first step in subordinate job satisfaction
html.description.abstractA model of job satisfaction is tested through predictive relationships of manager socio-communicative style and job affect in subordinates. Results of the study showed that manager socio-communicative style (specifically, responsiveness) predicts subordinate job affect and that subordinate job affect predicts their own job satisfaction (explaining 38% of the variance). However, the study did not support manager socio-communicative style directly affecting subordinate job satisfaction. This study also examines perceived socio-communicative style of managers based on sex. Results of this part of the study showed that there is no significant difference between the perceived socio-communicative style of managers based on a manager being male or female.
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Arts in Communication
dc.typeThesis (M.A.)--University of Southern Indiana, 2012


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record