Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMontz, Amy L.
dc.contributor.advisorLee, Melanie
dc.contributor.advisorPopescu-Sandu, Oana A.
dc.contributor.authorHobson, Melissa Anne
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-09T18:13:42Z
dc.date.available2019-12-09T18:13:42Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/322
dc.descriptionThesis available in Rice Library University Archives and Special Collection.
dc.description.abstractRecent years have produced a trend in the YA literature genre which addresses the issue of mental illness and its stigmatization. Writers of dystopian novels have recognized the social problem of mental illness and have produced a new genre in order to combat this stigma - Young Adult Mental Illness Dystopia (YAMID). These YAMID novels criticize the treatment and mentality towards individuals who suffer from mental illness. Books like The Rest of Us Just Live Here (Ness) introduce diagnosed mental illness on a personal level, permitting readers to understand mental illness and empathize with those who experience it. However, novels such as Mindwalker (Steiger), The Program (Young). The Glimpse (Merle). and BZRK (Grant) show the implications of stigmatization on a social level. In these novels, individuals with mental illness are oppressed by the government, resulting in society-wide perspectives that resemble the relationship between the colonized and the colonizer in postcolonial literature. This comparison provides an increased understanding of the treatment of people with mental illness, as the colonizer entity subjects them through the imperial gaze and Orientalism, attempts to assimilate them into a mimicry of the dominant culture, and uses surveillance to transform them into the ultimate docile body. This thesis will discuss the aforementioned novels in view of the colonizer/colonized relationship, providing a unique understanding of the stigmatization of mental illness, treatment, and medication in modem society.
dc.titleDefense of mental illness in young adult dystopias
html.description.abstractRecent years have produced a trend in the YA literature genre which addresses the issue of mental illness and its stigmatization. Writers of dystopian novels have recognized the social problem of mental illness and have produced a new genre in order to combat this stigma - Young Adult Mental Illness Dystopia (YAMID). These YAMID novels criticize the treatment and mentality towards individuals who suffer from mental illness. Books like The Rest of Us Just Live Here (Ness) introduce diagnosed mental illness on a personal level, permitting readers to understand mental illness and empathize with those who experience it. However, novels such as Mindwalker (Steiger), The Program (Young). The Glimpse (Merle). and BZRK (Grant) show the implications of stigmatization on a social level. In these novels, individuals with mental illness are oppressed by the government, resulting in society-wide perspectives that resemble the relationship between the colonized and the colonizer in postcolonial literature. This comparison provides an increased understanding of the treatment of people with mental illness, as the colonizer entity subjects them through the imperial gaze and Orientalism, attempts to assimilate them into a mimicry of the dominant culture, and uses surveillance to transform them into the ultimate docile body. This thesis will discuss the aforementioned novels in view of the colonizer/colonized relationship, providing a unique understanding of the stigmatization of mental illness, treatment, and medication in modem society.
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Arts in English
dc.typeThesis (M.A.)--University of Southern Indiana, 2016


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record