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dc.contributor.advisorEvey, Julie
dc.contributor.advisorGabennesch, Howard R.
dc.contributor.advisorWilhelmus, Thomas A.
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Linda F.
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-09T18:13:42Z
dc.date.available2019-12-09T18:13:42Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/329
dc.descriptionThesis available in Rice Library University Archives and Special Collection.
dc.description.abstractWilliam James is widely considered the father of the "new psychology" in America. He embraced the objective scientific approach, but did not abandon the subjective introspectionist tradition of the philosopher/psychologist. This thesis explores the value and limitations of introspection as a methodology in psychology, as illustrated by the work of James. His 1890 psychology textbook, Principles of Psychology, was the central resource. The works of psychology's historians and James's biographers and critics were also consulted in the survey, as well as present-day theorists in psychology, neuroscience, and physics who cite the work of James to support their own ideas. His astute use of introspection, uniquely complemented by his pragmatic and pluralistic leanings, enabled James to draw conclusions about human psychology that were influential and ahead of his time. James's example teaches us that introspection and subjectivity should retain a place in today's psychology.
dc.titleWilliam James : the last great introspective psychologist?
html.description.abstractWilliam James is widely considered the father of the "new psychology" in America. He embraced the objective scientific approach, but did not abandon the subjective introspectionist tradition of the philosopher/psychologist. This thesis explores the value and limitations of introspection as a methodology in psychology, as illustrated by the work of James. His 1890 psychology textbook, Principles of Psychology, was the central resource. The works of psychology's historians and James's biographers and critics were also consulted in the survey, as well as present-day theorists in psychology, neuroscience, and physics who cite the work of James to support their own ideas. His astute use of introspection, uniquely complemented by his pragmatic and pluralistic leanings, enabled James to draw conclusions about human psychology that were influential and ahead of his time. James's example teaches us that introspection and subjectivity should retain a place in today's psychology.
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Arts in Liberal Studies
dc.typeThesis (M.A.L.S.)--University of Southern Indiana, 2005


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