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dc.contributor.advisorGabennesch, Howard R.
dc.contributor.advisorWaitman, Michael D.
dc.contributor.advisorGooden, Susan H.
dc.contributor.authorHumphrey, Lois M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-09T18:13:43Z
dc.date.available2019-12-09T18:13:43Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/336
dc.descriptionThesis available in Rice Library University Archives and Special Collection.
dc.description.abstractPart I presents the background for recent education reform in the state of Kentucky. After reform was mandated by the judicial system in 1988, the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA) was passed in 1990 and education as the citizens of Kentucky knew it had suddenly changed. Teachers were told to teach differently and students, therefore, were exposed to new styles of learning and held to new standards. Part Two focuses on the changes that occurred in the ten years since the Reform Act. Kentucky was suddenly a state involved with high stakes assessment. Not only had teaching and learning changed, but also abrupt changes in assessing a school's performance were implemented with unprecedented speed. Rewards and sanctions from the State Department of Education dangled above the heads of teachers and administrators alike. It was not an easy time for many and in some cases, people felt the need to try and cheat the system. The stress on teachers was incredible. Looking at the future and the goals set for the educational system in Kentucky is the focus of Part Three. As the second decade of changes began to take hold, new goals were set for the schools of the state. One such goal is that all students score at a "proficient" rating with 100% or better on the CATS exam. This section examines why this particular goal cannot be met.
dc.titleDecade of education reform in Kentucky
html.description.abstractPart I presents the background for recent education reform in the state of Kentucky. After reform was mandated by the judicial system in 1988, the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA) was passed in 1990 and education as the citizens of Kentucky knew it had suddenly changed. Teachers were told to teach differently and students, therefore, were exposed to new styles of learning and held to new standards. Part Two focuses on the changes that occurred in the ten years since the Reform Act. Kentucky was suddenly a state involved with high stakes assessment. Not only had teaching and learning changed, but also abrupt changes in assessing a school's performance were implemented with unprecedented speed. Rewards and sanctions from the State Department of Education dangled above the heads of teachers and administrators alike. It was not an easy time for many and in some cases, people felt the need to try and cheat the system. The stress on teachers was incredible. Looking at the future and the goals set for the educational system in Kentucky is the focus of Part Three. As the second decade of changes began to take hold, new goals were set for the schools of the state. One such goal is that all students score at a "proficient" rating with 100% or better on the CATS exam. This section examines why this particular goal cannot be met.
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Arts in Liberal Studies
dc.typeThesis (M.A.L.S.)--University of Southern Indiana, 2001


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