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dc.contributor.advisorGordon, Scott Gordon
dc.contributor.advisorRivers, Thomas M.
dc.contributor.advisorPrice, Charles
dc.contributor.authorMark, Rick
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-09T18:13:43Z
dc.date.available2019-12-09T18:13:43Z
dc.date.issued1999
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/345
dc.descriptionThesis available in Rice Library University Archives and Special Collection.
dc.description.abstractThis notebook contains a printed version of the Web site I created as the capstone project for my Master of Arts degree in Liberal Studies at the University of Southern Indiana. The Web site provides a guide to the wildflowers of Twin Swamps Nature Preserve, which is in the southwest tip of Indiana, near where the Wabash River flows into the Ohio. It is about 25 miles west of USI. Twin Swamps is a quiet place, a wild place, a place of remarkable diversity that contrasts sharply with the order and monotony of surrounding fields of com and soybean and sorghum. It's a place that has been given over to the plants and insects and birds, a place where we can watch in minute detail as nature recycles itself, as things grow and die and decay and replenish the soil and are born again. Twin Swamps was set aside in 1987 to save one of Indiana's last stands of bald cypress trees. This stately tree of southern swamplands reaches its northern limit here. The bald cypress is the only eastern relative of the redwoods and sequoias of California. Its broad buttressed base and the odd knobby "knees" protruding from its roots help it survive in the shallow waters of the swamp. Also protected at Twin Swamps is the overcup oak, another southern tree that thrives in swampland. The overcup oak has an unusual round acorn with a cap that nearly covers the nut, so it looks like a big scaly marble. Twin Swamps represents an ecological region known as the Southern Bottomlands of Indiana. This region, which hugs the lower Wabash and Ohio rivers, has the state's longest growing period. Temperatures, rainfall and humidity are relatively high; winters are mild. Because of this, Twin Swamps has several plants and animals that are characteristic of the southern United States and which reach their northern limit in Posey County. The Web site includes photographs and descriptions of about 120 species of flowering plants. In 1998, I hiked the one-and-a-half-mile trail through the nature preserve at least once a week and photographed every wildflower I could find. I then identified the plants as best I could, often bringing specimens to a USI biology lab for study. Any specimens I collected have been preserved in the USI herbarium. The Web site is meant to be a resource for botanists, educators, and weekend nature lovers. Teachers may use the site as a preview for class field trips. Nature lovers will have a field guide that focuses specifically on the plants at the preserve, so they won't have to wade through a more traditional field guide that includes hundreds of species not found at Twin Swamps.
dc.titleOn the Web : a computerized field guide to the wildflowers of Twin Swamps Nature Preserve
html.description.abstractThis notebook contains a printed version of the Web site I created as the capstone project for my Master of Arts degree in Liberal Studies at the University of Southern Indiana. The Web site provides a guide to the wildflowers of Twin Swamps Nature Preserve, which is in the southwest tip of Indiana, near where the Wabash River flows into the Ohio. It is about 25 miles west of USI. Twin Swamps is a quiet place, a wild place, a place of remarkable diversity that contrasts sharply with the order and monotony of surrounding fields of com and soybean and sorghum. It's a place that has been given over to the plants and insects and birds, a place where we can watch in minute detail as nature recycles itself, as things grow and die and decay and replenish the soil and are born again. Twin Swamps was set aside in 1987 to save one of Indiana's last stands of bald cypress trees. This stately tree of southern swamplands reaches its northern limit here. The bald cypress is the only eastern relative of the redwoods and sequoias of California. Its broad buttressed base and the odd knobby "knees" protruding from its roots help it survive in the shallow waters of the swamp. Also protected at Twin Swamps is the overcup oak, another southern tree that thrives in swampland. The overcup oak has an unusual round acorn with a cap that nearly covers the nut, so it looks like a big scaly marble. Twin Swamps represents an ecological region known as the Southern Bottomlands of Indiana. This region, which hugs the lower Wabash and Ohio rivers, has the state's longest growing period. Temperatures, rainfall and humidity are relatively high; winters are mild. Because of this, Twin Swamps has several plants and animals that are characteristic of the southern United States and which reach their northern limit in Posey County. The Web site includes photographs and descriptions of about 120 species of flowering plants. In 1998, I hiked the one-and-a-half-mile trail through the nature preserve at least once a week and photographed every wildflower I could find. I then identified the plants as best I could, often bringing specimens to a USI biology lab for study. Any specimens I collected have been preserved in the USI herbarium. The Web site is meant to be a resource for botanists, educators, and weekend nature lovers. Teachers may use the site as a preview for class field trips. Nature lovers will have a field guide that focuses specifically on the plants at the preserve, so they won't have to wade through a more traditional field guide that includes hundreds of species not found at Twin Swamps.
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Arts in Liberal Studies
dc.typeThesis (M.A.L.S.)--University of Southern Indiana, 1999


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