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dc.contributor.advisorTew, Chad R.
dc.contributor.advisorSchroer, Todd J.
dc.contributor.advisorRobbins, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorScott, Kristi N.
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-09T18:13:44Z
dc.date.available2019-12-09T18:13:44Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/351
dc.descriptionThesis available in Rice Library University Archives and Special Collection.
dc.description.abstractThis study focuses on people who use Second Life and are self-reported introverts or extrovert s and how these personality traits may produce predictable differences in a person's participation in virtual life. Previous research has examined introverts and extroverts and showed varying levels of sociability. This thesis, however, looks at whether or not such variance exists between the self-reported personality and the virtual character created by the introvert or extrovert in a virtual world like Second Life. This paper builds on previous research about introverted and extroverted personalities and especially the comparisons between self and online personalities using the virtual world (Amichai-Hamburger & Wianapel, 2002; Amichai-Hamburger, Kaplan & Dorpatcheon, 2008; Bargh, 2002; Gergen, 1991; Gonzales, 2008; Marcus, 2006; McKenna, 2000; Messinger, Ge, Stroulia, Lyons, Smimov, & Bone, 2008). In a study of Second Life, 109 participants have been surveyed in order to probe further empirically into the virtual life of introverts and extroverts. The focus of the survey research is aimed at discerning whether or not the personality traits of introverts and extroverts for subjects transfers to the personalities they create for their Second Life avatars. The examination will seek to provide a foundation for further exploration in the future by providing a framework of virtual reality personalities as "masks," which is performance in the virtual world that is unlike their self, or "mirrors," which is the transfer of their "real life" personality to the virtual world context. This approach is meant to provide insight into a new computermediated world filled with avatars that is rich with possibilities and information.
dc.titleSecond self through Second Life : mask or mirror?
html.description.abstractThis study focuses on people who use Second Life and are self-reported introverts or extrovert s and how these personality traits may produce predictable differences in a person's participation in virtual life. Previous research has examined introverts and extroverts and showed varying levels of sociability. This thesis, however, looks at whether or not such variance exists between the self-reported personality and the virtual character created by the introvert or extrovert in a virtual world like Second Life. This paper builds on previous research about introverted and extroverted personalities and especially the comparisons between self and online personalities using the virtual world (Amichai-Hamburger & Wianapel, 2002; Amichai-Hamburger, Kaplan & Dorpatcheon, 2008; Bargh, 2002; Gergen, 1991; Gonzales, 2008; Marcus, 2006; McKenna, 2000; Messinger, Ge, Stroulia, Lyons, Smimov, & Bone, 2008). In a study of Second Life, 109 participants have been surveyed in order to probe further empirically into the virtual life of introverts and extroverts. The focus of the survey research is aimed at discerning whether or not the personality traits of introverts and extroverts for subjects transfers to the personalities they create for their Second Life avatars. The examination will seek to provide a foundation for further exploration in the future by providing a framework of virtual reality personalities as "masks," which is performance in the virtual world that is unlike their self, or "mirrors," which is the transfer of their "real life" personality to the virtual world context. This approach is meant to provide insight into a new computermediated world filled with avatars that is rich with possibilities and information.
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Arts in Liberal Studies
dc.typeThesis (M.A.L.S.)--University of Southern Indiana, 2009


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