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dc.contributor.advisorStiler, Gary M.
dc.contributor.advisorRoat, Ronald C.
dc.contributor.advisorHines, Carolyn B.
dc.contributor.authorTichenor, Alisha.
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-09T18:13:44Z
dc.date.available2019-12-09T18:13:44Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/354
dc.descriptionThesis available in Rice Library University Archives and Special Collection.
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this Capstone Project is to develop a guidebook for high school journalism advisers with the aim of helping to make their advising experiences and publications more successful. Research reveals that the majority of high school journalism advisers do not possess formal training in journalism prior to their first journalism teaching assignments. After becoming journalism advisers, most of the training these individuals receive is through summer workshops or from more experienced advisers. The significance of unqualified journalism teachers teaching students is very problematic for education. Primarily, bad instruction by these teachers could cause more damage to students than none at all. Not only do many high schools have unsatisfactory publications but many talented students become disinterested in the subject and the profession misses an opportunity to recruit new talent. Underqualified teachers also run the risk of not emphasizing the significant role the press plays in our country which was founded on the freedom of expression. While the problem of underqualified journalism advisers is significant, there are steps that can be taken to help these teachers get to a more desired state. Research reveals that journalism advisers can greatly benefit by taking journalism and communication courses at the university level and that attendance at annual high school journalism conferences with staff members is also a great way to increase teachers' knowledge in the area of journalism. If high school journalism advisers also receive the appropriate schooling and have access to resources, like the guidebook I produced, I believe that the success rate of high school journalism programs across the country will increase. The guidebook for high school journalism advisers discusses in detail the importance of adequate desktop publishing technology and equipment, the need to meet deadlines, principles of good design, photography and journalistic writing, why journalism workshops are helpful, an understanding of high school journalism curriculum 1 and press rights, and understanding the responsibilities of managing a budget and the role journalism plays in society.
dc.titleChallenges of high school journalism advising; a study and guidebook to improve publications
html.description.abstractThe purpose of this Capstone Project is to develop a guidebook for high school journalism advisers with the aim of helping to make their advising experiences and publications more successful. Research reveals that the majority of high school journalism advisers do not possess formal training in journalism prior to their first journalism teaching assignments. After becoming journalism advisers, most of the training these individuals receive is through summer workshops or from more experienced advisers. The significance of unqualified journalism teachers teaching students is very problematic for education. Primarily, bad instruction by these teachers could cause more damage to students than none at all. Not only do many high schools have unsatisfactory publications but many talented students become disinterested in the subject and the profession misses an opportunity to recruit new talent. Underqualified teachers also run the risk of not emphasizing the significant role the press plays in our country which was founded on the freedom of expression. While the problem of underqualified journalism advisers is significant, there are steps that can be taken to help these teachers get to a more desired state. Research reveals that journalism advisers can greatly benefit by taking journalism and communication courses at the university level and that attendance at annual high school journalism conferences with staff members is also a great way to increase teachers' knowledge in the area of journalism. If high school journalism advisers also receive the appropriate schooling and have access to resources, like the guidebook I produced, I believe that the success rate of high school journalism programs across the country will increase. The guidebook for high school journalism advisers discusses in detail the importance of adequate desktop publishing technology and equipment, the need to meet deadlines, principles of good design, photography and journalistic writing, why journalism workshops are helpful, an understanding of high school journalism curriculum 1 and press rights, and understanding the responsibilities of managing a budget and the role journalism plays in society.
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Arts in Liberal Studies
dc.typeThesis (M.A.L.S.)--University of Southern Indiana, 2002


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