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dc.contributor.advisorFredrich, Augustine J.
dc.contributor.advisorDavis-Brezette, Jane
dc.contributor.advisorPetranek, Charles F.
dc.contributor.authorTrible, Linda M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-09T18:13:44Z
dc.date.available2019-12-09T18:13:44Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/355
dc.descriptionThesis available in Rice Library University Archives and Special Collection.
dc.description.abstractThree hundred student athletes from high schools in southwestern Indiana responded to a questionnaire designed to-identify psychological and sociological factors which motivate them to participate in organized sports at the freshman, junior varsity and varsity levels, and to determine if such information could be incorporated into the academic environment. Students described the reasons they participate, the influences of coaches and parents, their feelings toward training and competition, and whether they felt their athletic careers would continue upon graduation from high school. Various theories regarding motivation in general, and motivation of athletes specifically were reviewed and applied to the responses of the local students. The achievement goal theory, in particular, seems to hold the key as to why some students are disposed toward setting realistic goals and adapting their behavior toward fulfillment in an athletic environment. Students who are disposed toward self-improvement and skill development, and who are exposed to a mastery-oriented climate are more likely to experience enjoyment and satisfaction from participation in sports. They are also more likely to continue their participation after graduation from high school. While many contributing factors are present, the thrill of competition, as well as the socialization and enjoyment involved with organized sports in general, provide the impetus for a majority of students to participate on athletic teams.
dc.titleIdentification of factors which motivate high school athletes
html.description.abstractThree hundred student athletes from high schools in southwestern Indiana responded to a questionnaire designed to-identify psychological and sociological factors which motivate them to participate in organized sports at the freshman, junior varsity and varsity levels, and to determine if such information could be incorporated into the academic environment. Students described the reasons they participate, the influences of coaches and parents, their feelings toward training and competition, and whether they felt their athletic careers would continue upon graduation from high school. Various theories regarding motivation in general, and motivation of athletes specifically were reviewed and applied to the responses of the local students. The achievement goal theory, in particular, seems to hold the key as to why some students are disposed toward setting realistic goals and adapting their behavior toward fulfillment in an athletic environment. Students who are disposed toward self-improvement and skill development, and who are exposed to a mastery-oriented climate are more likely to experience enjoyment and satisfaction from participation in sports. They are also more likely to continue their participation after graduation from high school. While many contributing factors are present, the thrill of competition, as well as the socialization and enjoyment involved with organized sports in general, provide the impetus for a majority of students to participate on athletic teams.
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Arts in Liberal Studies
dc.typeThesis (M.A.L.S.)--University of Southern Indiana, 2003


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