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dc.contributor.advisorHamon, Joyce A.
dc.contributor.advisorBrooks, Peggy
dc.contributor.advisorCrews, Kathleen
dc.contributor.authorKuchenbrod, Kelly S.
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-09T18:13:44Z
dc.date.available2019-12-09T18:13:44Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/362
dc.descriptionThesis available in Rice Library University Archives and Special Collection.
dc.description.abstractMy father was born 150 years too late. His interest in the 1830's and that way of life has sparked excitement for me also. He is an excellent woodworker and has built and repaired several log structures. He built a spinning wheel from scratch and then challenged me to learn to use it. The capstone project focused on the spinning wheel he built. The main component of the project was a children's book. The book was written from a five year old prospective, as if my daughter were telling the story. It was illustrated with pictures taken by me or of me as I learned to spin and showed the art of spinning to others. The book illustrates some of the aspects of spinning and preparation of wool yarn. The behind-the-scenes work of historical interpreters was also shown. My hopes are that the book will find a niche at state parks, museums, and interpretive centers to illustrate and explain spinning and pioneer reenactments. While working on the children's book, a journal, travel log, and scrapbook were kept. These served as my personal records of my time and effort spent working on the project. The scrapbook contains pictures and other memorabilia of the places I have visited as I advanced as a spinner and demonstrated to people the art of spinning. In order to learn to spin, process the wool, and make yarn, I have interviewed several experienced spinners. These people were excellent resources for my spinning project. I also got a subscription to Spin Off, a magazine for spinners. It gave tips to beginners and advanced spinners as well as historical information and interesting stories and reviews. A bibliography of several books is included. The books, magazines, and interviews helped me with the basics and taught me history and folklore associated with spinning. Joyce Hamon, my chair, was my source of guidance and information concerning readability and age appropriateness for the children's book. After spending the summer and the fall of2001 spinning, volunteering as a demonstrator at various events, visiting other spinners and spinning at home, I obtained enough pictures to complete the children's book. I traveled 1819 miles and volunteered 82 hours demonstrating the art of spinning. This does not include the many hours spent spinning in my living room as I tried to master the spinning wheel.
dc.titleSpinning wheels and reenactments of the past
html.description.abstractMy father was born 150 years too late. His interest in the 1830's and that way of life has sparked excitement for me also. He is an excellent woodworker and has built and repaired several log structures. He built a spinning wheel from scratch and then challenged me to learn to use it. The capstone project focused on the spinning wheel he built. The main component of the project was a children's book. The book was written from a five year old prospective, as if my daughter were telling the story. It was illustrated with pictures taken by me or of me as I learned to spin and showed the art of spinning to others. The book illustrates some of the aspects of spinning and preparation of wool yarn. The behind-the-scenes work of historical interpreters was also shown. My hopes are that the book will find a niche at state parks, museums, and interpretive centers to illustrate and explain spinning and pioneer reenactments. While working on the children's book, a journal, travel log, and scrapbook were kept. These served as my personal records of my time and effort spent working on the project. The scrapbook contains pictures and other memorabilia of the places I have visited as I advanced as a spinner and demonstrated to people the art of spinning. In order to learn to spin, process the wool, and make yarn, I have interviewed several experienced spinners. These people were excellent resources for my spinning project. I also got a subscription to Spin Off, a magazine for spinners. It gave tips to beginners and advanced spinners as well as historical information and interesting stories and reviews. A bibliography of several books is included. The books, magazines, and interviews helped me with the basics and taught me history and folklore associated with spinning. Joyce Hamon, my chair, was my source of guidance and information concerning readability and age appropriateness for the children's book. After spending the summer and the fall of2001 spinning, volunteering as a demonstrator at various events, visiting other spinners and spinning at home, I obtained enough pictures to complete the children's book. I traveled 1819 miles and volunteered 82 hours demonstrating the art of spinning. This does not include the many hours spent spinning in my living room as I tried to master the spinning wheel.
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Arts in Liberal Studies
dc.typeThesis (M.A.L.S.)--University of Southern Indiana, 2001


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