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dc.contributor.advisorGoss, Larry D.
dc.contributor.advisorFredrich, Augustine J.
dc.contributor.advisorHollander, Steve
dc.contributor.authorAlcorn, Audrey G.
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-09T18:13:45Z
dc.date.available2019-12-09T18:13:45Z
dc.date.issued1993
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/373
dc.descriptionThesis available in Rice Library University Archives and Special Collection.
dc.description.abstractPotter & Brumfield, due to the world class competitiveness of the electronics industry, must implement Just-In-Time (JIT) manufacturing techniques to survive. Success of a JIT program depends upon the order of JIT process implementation. Manufacturing must be recognized as the key to this success and must, therefore, take priority over quality, materials management and scheduling, in terms of implementation. Implementing JIT in manufacturing means reducing the leadtime. This can be achieved through several steps: reduce setup time {especially on bottleneck operations); analyze the flow of material through production lines and group technology and cell manufacturing concept design. When this is accomplished, the other aspects of Just-In-Time manufacturing will fall in place and their benefits will be realized. Production, inventory, scheduling, purchasing, and accounting systems need to change to facilitate JIT on the manufacturing floor. Worker involvement is a key factor throughout the implementation process. Teams should be organized in an effort to reduce setup times. Additionally, changes must occur with respect to job classification within the cell, organizational structure of the cell, training of affected employees, and the pay structure within the cell.
dc.titleImplementing just-in-time manufacturing using Potter & Brumfield's printed wiring board department as a model
html.description.abstractPotter & Brumfield, due to the world class competitiveness of the electronics industry, must implement Just-In-Time (JIT) manufacturing techniques to survive. Success of a JIT program depends upon the order of JIT process implementation. Manufacturing must be recognized as the key to this success and must, therefore, take priority over quality, materials management and scheduling, in terms of implementation. Implementing JIT in manufacturing means reducing the leadtime. This can be achieved through several steps: reduce setup time {especially on bottleneck operations); analyze the flow of material through production lines and group technology and cell manufacturing concept design. When this is accomplished, the other aspects of Just-In-Time manufacturing will fall in place and their benefits will be realized. Production, inventory, scheduling, purchasing, and accounting systems need to change to facilitate JIT on the manufacturing floor. Worker involvement is a key factor throughout the implementation process. Teams should be organized in an effort to reduce setup times. Additionally, changes must occur with respect to job classification within the cell, organizational structure of the cell, training of affected employees, and the pay structure within the cell.
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Science in Industrial Management
dc.typeThesis (M.S.I.M.)--University of Southern Indiana, 1993


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