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dc.contributor.advisorMitchell, Jr., Zane W.
dc.contributor.advisorSchultz, David E.
dc.contributor.advisorSprouls, Eric P.
dc.contributor.advisorHines, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorBogosian, Zane Christopher
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-09T18:13:45Z
dc.date.available2019-12-09T18:13:45Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/379
dc.descriptionThesis available in Rice Library University Archives and Special Collection.
dc.description.abstractThroughout the course of several years, cladding of High Strength, Low Alloy (HSLA) steel with stainless steel filler material has proved to be problematic. Specifically, cladding with the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process has created a phenomenon known as 'plasma jet porosity' in as-machined cladding deposits of stainless steel filler material. This problem has resulted in thousands of hours per year in repair due to failed nondestructive evaluation (NOE) of the as-machined cladding. The objective of this investigation is to attempt to reduce or eliminate the cause of plasma jet porosity in stainless steel cladding at The Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Operations Group, Barberton (NOG-B) manufacturing site. The initial proposed method was to remove the GMA W process and replace it with a more robust, proven method of cladding. Unfortunately, time and budget constraints did not allow the proposed method to come to full fruition by the end of this investigation. Instead, a combination of the proposed method and a method chosen for cost effective reasons helped significantly reduce the overall clad defect and repair rate at NOG-B for the 2012 calendar year. The chosen method involved much higher oversight by shop and contract welding engineering at NOG-B. The results of this investigation led to a cladding defect and repair reduction of nearly 75% when compared to the 2011 calendar year. This investigation has caused a change in the manufacturing sequence of stainless steel cladded HSLA pressure vessels at NOG-B, and its results have provided a vehicle in which to further reduce defects in the future.
dc.titleStainless steel pressure vessel cladding improvement
html.description.abstractThroughout the course of several years, cladding of High Strength, Low Alloy (HSLA) steel with stainless steel filler material has proved to be problematic. Specifically, cladding with the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process has created a phenomenon known as 'plasma jet porosity' in as-machined cladding deposits of stainless steel filler material. This problem has resulted in thousands of hours per year in repair due to failed nondestructive evaluation (NOE) of the as-machined cladding. The objective of this investigation is to attempt to reduce or eliminate the cause of plasma jet porosity in stainless steel cladding at The Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Operations Group, Barberton (NOG-B) manufacturing site. The initial proposed method was to remove the GMA W process and replace it with a more robust, proven method of cladding. Unfortunately, time and budget constraints did not allow the proposed method to come to full fruition by the end of this investigation. Instead, a combination of the proposed method and a method chosen for cost effective reasons helped significantly reduce the overall clad defect and repair rate at NOG-B for the 2012 calendar year. The chosen method involved much higher oversight by shop and contract welding engineering at NOG-B. The results of this investigation led to a cladding defect and repair reduction of nearly 75% when compared to the 2011 calendar year. This investigation has caused a change in the manufacturing sequence of stainless steel cladded HSLA pressure vessels at NOG-B, and its results have provided a vehicle in which to further reduce defects in the future.
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Science in Industrial Management
dc.typeThesis (M.S.I.M.)--University of Southern Indiana, 2013


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