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dc.contributor.advisorFredrich, Augustine J.
dc.contributor.advisorGoss, Larry D.
dc.contributor.advisorDick, Edward J.
dc.contributor.authorHeaton, C. Edward
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-09T18:13:47Z
dc.date.available2019-12-09T18:13:47Z
dc.date.issued1988
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/405
dc.descriptionThesis available in Rice Library University Archives and Special Collection.
dc.description.abstractExcessive generating capacity within the electric utility industry has forced utilities to take a closer look at reducing costs. The focal points of cost reduction, as far as this study is concerned, are threefold; 1) relying foremost on the least-cost electric generating units, with secondary reliance on the higher-cost generating units; 2) extending the life of steam turbines so as to minimize costly overhauls; and 3) carefully timing the costly turbine overhauls to ensure that they are not performed prematurely or beyond the point that the costs of the overhaul exceed the benefits of restored performance. All three of these methods of cost reduction can be achieved through the continual, comparative monitoring of steam turbine performance. This paper addresses the problems of monitoring the performance of a steam turbine used to generate electricity. The turbines discussed in this study are General Electric G2 turbines located at the Public service of Indiana's Gibson Generating Station. A performance test method is devised that utilizes existing plant instrumentation and a repeatable test load. Data reduction and reporting methods are discussed. The preliminary test findings indicate that the new testing methods are yielding an accurate representation of the steam turbine's performance.
dc.titleTurbine performance diagnostics using in-plant instrumentation
html.description.abstractExcessive generating capacity within the electric utility industry has forced utilities to take a closer look at reducing costs. The focal points of cost reduction, as far as this study is concerned, are threefold; 1) relying foremost on the least-cost electric generating units, with secondary reliance on the higher-cost generating units; 2) extending the life of steam turbines so as to minimize costly overhauls; and 3) carefully timing the costly turbine overhauls to ensure that they are not performed prematurely or beyond the point that the costs of the overhaul exceed the benefits of restored performance. All three of these methods of cost reduction can be achieved through the continual, comparative monitoring of steam turbine performance. This paper addresses the problems of monitoring the performance of a steam turbine used to generate electricity. The turbines discussed in this study are General Electric G2 turbines located at the Public service of Indiana's Gibson Generating Station. A performance test method is devised that utilizes existing plant instrumentation and a repeatable test load. Data reduction and reporting methods are discussed. The preliminary test findings indicate that the new testing methods are yielding an accurate representation of the steam turbine's performance.
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Science in Industrial Management
dc.typeThesis (M.S.I.M.)--University of Southern Indiana, 1988


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