Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMcDonald, Thomas N.
dc.contributor.advisorKuban, Paul
dc.contributor.advisorMikulski, Stephanie
dc.contributor.authorWolfe, Rockie S.
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-09T18:13:49Z
dc.date.available2019-12-09T18:13:49Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/438
dc.descriptionThesis available in Rice Library University Archives and Special Collection.
dc.description.abstractAutomation has evolved into many levels of complexity and points of failure. In this research paper the focus is on automation disaster recovery methods and examples. Also, extra effort was put into the growing interdependency of automation and Information Technology (IT) in the modem manufacturing facilities of today. Disaster recovery plans under the business continuity model is briefly discussed as research and articles in this area have been in print for decades if not centuries. Some discussion is covered in the benefit-cost analysis section. This short discussion is not meant to take away from the importance of benefit-cost analysis to artfully sell needed projects to procurement and upper management. The research is broken down into five different yet related disciplines: Automation, Disaster Recovery Plans, Information Technology, the new Hybrid, and Benefit Cost Analysis. After covering the five different disciplines there is a follow up with an example application for Automation / IT Disaster Recovery Plan. The intent of this paper is to create guidance for starting a disaster recovery plan in a manufacturing setting. Unfortunately no '"one size fits all" and the many challenges of natural and intellectual negative effects on business continuity will demand a lifelong commitment to investment, education, and awareness.
dc.titleAutomation & network disaster recovery planning (ANDRP)
html.description.abstractAutomation has evolved into many levels of complexity and points of failure. In this research paper the focus is on automation disaster recovery methods and examples. Also, extra effort was put into the growing interdependency of automation and Information Technology (IT) in the modem manufacturing facilities of today. Disaster recovery plans under the business continuity model is briefly discussed as research and articles in this area have been in print for decades if not centuries. Some discussion is covered in the benefit-cost analysis section. This short discussion is not meant to take away from the importance of benefit-cost analysis to artfully sell needed projects to procurement and upper management. The research is broken down into five different yet related disciplines: Automation, Disaster Recovery Plans, Information Technology, the new Hybrid, and Benefit Cost Analysis. After covering the five different disciplines there is a follow up with an example application for Automation / IT Disaster Recovery Plan. The intent of this paper is to create guidance for starting a disaster recovery plan in a manufacturing setting. Unfortunately no '"one size fits all" and the many challenges of natural and intellectual negative effects on business continuity will demand a lifelong commitment to investment, education, and awareness.
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Science in Industrial Management
dc.typeThesis (M.S.I.M.)--University of Southern Indiana, 2014


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record