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dc.contributor.authorCeluch, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorValadares, Kevin
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-04T20:57:37Z
dc.date.available2020-02-04T20:57:37Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/496
dc.descriptionPresentation. 2nd Celebration of Teaching & Learning Symposium, January 25, 2018, the University of Southern Indiana
dc.description.abstractThe notion of transformative learning, learning that moves beyond content to impact motivational commitment beyond the classroom is a focus of higher education. While a laudable goal, questions exist as to the specific cognitions involved in the process of driving lifelong learning. The self-regulated learning perspective has become a dominant viewpoint from which to explore transformative (lifelong) learning. Self-regulated learning views students as active participants in the learning process. Within self-regulatory frameworks, cognitive and motivational mediators are posited to influence the relationship between the classroom experience and student performance. The significance of self-regulatory learning is that it develops capacity for continuous learning beyond the classroom. The present research examined relationships among several key self-regulatory concepts. The sample for the study consisted of students who were assigned classes in a classroom specifically designed for active/collaborative learning at USI. Eight different classes were assigned this learning space. While classes utilized different content-related in-class activities, all classes employed student group activities as a significant component of the in-class experience. Paper questionnaires were distributed toward the end of semester classes. The distribution procedure resulted in a total of 206 completed questionnaires. Conditional process analysis was used to provide a rigorous test of direct and indirect effects of independent variables on a dependent variable. Consistent with predictions, student perceptions of active learning were found to interact with perceptions of student-faculty interaction to influence a student's mastery goal orientation such that stronger active learning perceptions have a greater effect on mastery goal orientation when students perceive lower student-faculty interaction. Further, this interaction was found to work through mastery goal orientation to influence student self-efficacy for self-regulated learning. Implications of this research point to the significance of the use of active learning to help drive students' mastery goal orientation and self-regulatory capacity.
dc.subjectimproving student engagement and motivation
dc.subjectlearning in specific settings or contexts
dc.titleThe Role of Active Learning and Student-Faculty-Interaction in Student Lifelong Learning
html.description.abstract<p>The notion of transformative learning, learning that moves beyond content to impact motivational commitment beyond the classroom is a focus of higher education. While a laudable goal, questions exist as to the specific cognitions involved in the process of driving lifelong learning. The self-regulated learning perspective has become a dominant viewpoint from which to explore transformative (lifelong) learning. Self-regulated learning views students as active participants in the learning process. Within self-regulatory frameworks, cognitive and motivational mediators are posited to influence the relationship between the classroom experience and student performance. The significance of self-regulatory learning is that it develops capacity for continuous learning beyond the classroom. The present research examined relationships among several key self-regulatory concepts. The sample for the study consisted of students who were assigned classes in a classroom specifically designed for active/collaborative learning at USI. Eight different classes were assigned this learning space. While classes utilized different content-related in-class activities, all classes employed student group activities as a significant component of the in-class experience. Paper questionnaires were distributed toward the end of semester classes. The distribution procedure resulted in a total of 206 completed questionnaires. Conditional process analysis was used to provide a rigorous test of direct and indirect effects of independent variables on a dependent variable. Consistent with predictions, student perceptions of active learning were found to interact with perceptions of student-faculty interaction to influence a student's mastery goal orientation such that stronger active learning perceptions have a greater effect on mastery goal orientation when students perceive lower student-faculty interaction. Further, this interaction was found to work through mastery goal orientation to influence student self-efficacy for self-regulated learning. Implications of this research point to the significance of the use of active learning to help drive students' mastery goal orientation and self-regulatory capacity. </p>
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Southern indiana


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