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dc.contributor.authorDeligkaris, Christos
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-04T20:57:38Z
dc.date.available2020-02-04T20:57:38Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/497
dc.descriptionPresentation. 2nd Celebration of Teaching & Learning Symposium, January 25, 2018, the University of Southern Indiana
dc.description.abstractActive-learning in introductory physics classes, according to conclusive evidence in the physics education research literature, increases student grades, retention and learning. To include active-learning in class without compromising content, students need to acquire knowledge prior to class. Typically, this takes place by asking students to read the textbook and then take an online quiz based on what they read. In general, physics textbooks may be confusing, skip steps in theoretical proofs and example problems, and fail to demonstrate the coherence and organization of the discipline. This project sought to replace textbook reading assignments with short online videos prior to class in order to promote active learning in class. During the Spring 2017 implementation in General Physics II (PHYS176, algebra-based), the average normalized student learning gain of electricity and magnetism concepts was 55%. This learning gain is significantly higher than the national average of 23% of calculus-based electricity and magnetism introductory physics courses. Students completed the pre-class assignment almost all the time and found the online videos helpful for their learning. Thus, the use of online videos as part of pre-class assignments can significantly increase student learning.
dc.subjectimproving student engagement and motivation
dc.titleUsing Online Videos to Promote Active-Learning and Student Success
html.description.abstract<p>Active-learning in introductory physics classes, according to conclusive evidence in the physics education research literature, increases student grades, retention and learning. To include active-learning in class without compromising content, students need to acquire knowledge prior to class. Typically, this takes place by asking students to read the textbook and then take an online quiz based on what they read. In general, physics textbooks may be confusing, skip steps in theoretical proofs and example problems, and fail to demonstrate the coherence and organization of the discipline. This project sought to replace textbook reading assignments with short online videos prior to class in order to promote active learning in class. During the Spring 2017 implementation in General Physics II (PHYS176, algebra-based), the average normalized student learning gain of electricity and magnetism concepts was 55%. This learning gain is significantly higher than the national average of 23% of calculus-based electricity and magnetism introductory physics courses. Students completed the pre-class assignment almost all the time and found the online videos helpful for their learning. Thus, the use of online videos as part of pre-class assignments can significantly increase student learning.</p>
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Southern indiana


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