Now showing items 1-20 of 28

    • Appendix 5. John Chappellsmith letters in the Smithsonian Archives

      Kimberling, Clark
      Referenced in the chapter, “John Chappellsmith of Sheffield, London, and New Harmony: Artist and Writer,” in the book-in-progress, “That Wonder of the West…:” New Harmony on the Wabash."
    • Appendix 4. Twelve John Chappellsmith letters and one Margaret Chappellsmith letter published in Index, a Weekly Paper devoted to Free Religion, Toledo, Ohio, 1870-1880

      Kimberling, Clark
      Referenced in the chapter, “John Chappellsmith of Sheffield, London, and New Harmony: Artist and Writer,” in the book-in-progress, “That Wonder of the West…:” New Harmony on the Wabash."
    • Appendix 3. Items in the New Harmony Advertiser by or about John or Margaret Chappellsmith, 1858-1860

      Kimberling, Clark
      Referenced in the chapter, “John Chappellsmith of Sheffield, London, and New Harmony: Artist and Writer,” in the book-in-progress, “That Wonder of the West…:” New Harmony on the Wabash."
    • Appendix 2. Writings by John Chappellsmith and Margaret Chappellsmith in The Boston Investigator, April 11, 1860 – January 15, 1879

      Kimberling, Clark
      Referenced in the chapter, “John Chappellsmith of Sheffield, London, and New Harmony: Artist and Writer,” in the book-in-progress, “That Wonder of the West…:” New Harmony on the Wabash."
    • Appendix 1. Articles by Margaret Reynolds (later Chappellsmith) in the London Dispatch

      Kimberling, Clark
      Referenced in the chapter, “John Chappellsmith of Sheffield, London, and New Harmony: Artist and Writer,” in the book-in-progress, “That Wonder of the West…:” New Harmony on the Wabash."
    • Improving the Credibility of Empirical Legal Research: Practical Suggestions for Researchers, Journals and Law Schools

      Chin, Jason M; DeHaven, Alexander C; Heycke, Tobias; Holcombe, Alexander O; Mellor, David T; Pickett, Justin T; Steltenpohl, Crystal N; Vazire, Simine; Zeiler, Kathryn
      Fields closely related to empirical legal research (ELR) are enhancing their methods to improve the credibility of their findings. This includes making data, analysis codes and other materials openly available on digital repositories and preregistering studies. There are numerous benefits to these practices, such as research being easier to find and access through digital research methods. However, ELR appears to be lagging cognate fields. This may be partly due to a lack of field-specific meta-research and guidance. We sought to fill that gap by first evaluating credibility indicators in ELR, including a review of guidelines for legal journals. This review finds considerable room for improvement in how law journals regulate ELR. The remainder of the article provides practical guidance for the field. We start with general recommendations for empirical legal researchers and then turn to recommendations aimed at three commonly used empirical legal methods: content analyses of judicial decisions, surveys and qualitative studies. We end with suggestions for journals and law schools.
    • Psychological Science Accelerator: A Promising Resource for Clinical Psychological Science

      Beshears, Julie; Gjoneska, Biljana; Schmidt, Kathleen; Pfuhl, Gerit; Saari, Toni; McAuliffe, William H.B.; Steltenpohl, Crystal Nicole; Onie, Sandersan; Chartier, Christopher R.; Moshontz, Hannah
      Recent methodological reforms have succeeded in improving the rigor, accessibility, and transparency of psychological science, but these advances have not successfully proliferated certain subfields, including clinical psychology. Large-scale, crowdsourced collaborations offer clinical psychological scientists a way to conduct rigorous research on a scale not otherwise accessible to most researchers. The Psychological Science Accelerator (PSA) is an international collaborative network of psychological scientists that facilitates rigorous and generalizable research. In this chapter, we describe how the PSA can help clinical psychologists and clinical psychological science more broadly.
    • Society for the Improvement of Psychological Science Global Engagement Task Force Report

      Steltenpohl, Crystal Nicole; Montilla Doble, Lysander James; Basnight-Brown, Dana; Dutra, Natalia Bezerra; Belaus, Anabel; Kung, Chun-Chia; Onie, Sandersan; Seernani, Divya Prakash; Chen, Sau-Chin; Burin, DI; et al.
      The Society for the Improvement of Psychological Science (SIPS) is an organization whose mission focuses on bringing together scholars who want to improve methods and practices in psychological science. The organization reaffirmed in June 2020 that “[we] cannot do good science without diverse voices,” and acknowledged that “right now the demographics of SIPS are unrepresentative of the field of psychology, which is in turn unrepresentative of the global population. We have work to do when it comes to better supporting Black scholars and other underrepresented minorities.” The purpose of the Global Engagement Task Force, started in January 2020, was to explore suggestions made after the 2019 Annual Conference, held in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, around inclusion and access for scholars from regions outside of the United States, Canada, and Western Europe (described in the report as “geographically diverse” regions), a task complicated by the COVID-19 pandemic and civil unrest in several task force members’ countries of residence. This report outlines several suggestions, specifically around building partnerships with geographically diverse open science organizations; increasing SIPS presence at other, more local events; diversifying remote events; considering geographically diverse annual conference locations; improving membership and financial resources; and surveying open science practitioners from geographically diverse regions.
    • Conducting an Inventory with Shared Print in Mind

      Michaels, Sherri; Neel, Becca
      A physical inventory of the open stacks collection at Indiana University was conducted to determine the rate of error in the corresponding bibliographic records. The inventory was started to address some errors that were found when materials were pulled for offsite storage, but took on an increased importance as participation in shared print programs increased. This article describes the methodology used to conduct the inventory, as well as the rate of error found in the records for a large, open stack collection. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Collection Management on September 9, 2020 available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/10.1080/01462679.2020.1818343 Inventory dataset available at: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/592
    • Utilizing Video-Based Trainings to Improve Decision Making in High School Quarterbacks

      Powless, Matthew D.; Steinfeldt, Jesse A.; Fisher, Shelbi E.; McFadden, Patrick; Kennedy, Kyle W.; Bellini, Scott
      Despite working memory capacity’s (WMC) role in decision-making, there is a dearth of empirical literature concerned with working memory and how it relates to tactical decision-making in sport. The temporal occlusion paradigm has often been used by sport researchers to improve tactical decision-making and, thus, provides a well-established foundation for creating decision-making trainings. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to explore the implementation of computer-based learning modules to improve the tactical decision-making of four high school quarterbacks with varying levels of WMC, utilizing a single-subject, multiple baseline design. The learning modules utilized a temporal occlusion paradigm and present a novel intervention aimed at improving decision-making in quarterbacks. Data were analyzed using visual analysis and improvement rate difference (IRD). Overall, results did not demonstrate a causal relationship between changes in accuracy of decision-making after implementation of the learning modules, but did provide moderate evidence for improvement in reaction time for decision-making due to the learning modules. The learning modules were met with positive perceptions from the four participants, and the participant with the lowest WMC showed evidence of improvement in both accuracy and speed of decision-making. Limitations as well as implications will be discussed.
    • Herman B Wells Library Inventory Dataset, May 2015-December 2018

      Neel, Becca; Michaels, Sherri
      This dataset documents the bibliographic, status, and physical location errors discovered during the May 2015 - December 2018 inventory cycle of the Herman B Wells Library's physical collections. Data was collected and is organized by call number range.
    • The Influence of Confucianism on the Emergence and Regulation of Nonprofits in China

      Engbers, Trent
      In 2009, The Ministry of Civil Affairs (MoCA) of the People’s Republic of China commissioned a study of international experiences with the use of direct and indirect public policies for nonprofit organizations to deliver social and human services. While the study does produce a number of practical and interesting policy recommendations for the MoCA, there is an inherent problem with this type of research in that it assumes that lessons learned from one county context can be applied to other political and cultural domains without recognizing the unique cultural elements that shape the policy context. In China, a major cultural consideration is the influence of Confucian and Neo-Confucian traditions and beliefs. The Confucian tradition with its focus on the group over the individual and on responsibilities over rights seems to be highly conducive to fostering a robust system of nonprofit organizations (Fukuyama, 1995). However, the conclusion of this paper is the influence of Confucianism is complex and that is sometimes helps and sometimes hinders the development of the nonprofit sector. This study examines four Confucian values (Shu 恕, Ren 仁, Li 礼 and Wu lun 五伦) and their impact on the sector today.
    • Meat and Mental Health: a Systematic Review of Meat Abstention and Depression, Anxiety, and Related Phenomena

      Dobersek, Urska; Wy, Gabrielle; Adkins, Joshua; Altmeyer, Sydney; Krout, Kaitlin; Lavie, Carl; Archer, Edward
      Objective: To examine the relation between the consumption or avoidance of meat and psychological health and well-being. Methods: A systematic search of online databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL Plus, Medline, and Cochrane Library) was conducted for primary research examining psychological health in meat-consumers and meat-abstainers. Inclusion criteria were the provision of a clear distinction between meat-consumers and meat-abstainers, and data on factors related to psychological health. Studies examining meat consumption as a continuous or multi-level variable were excluded. Summary data were compiled, and qualitative analyses of methodologic rigor were conducted. The main outcome was the disparity in the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and related conditions in meat-consumers versus meat-abstainers. Secondary outcomes included mood and self-harm behaviors Results: Eighteen studies met the inclusion/exclusion criteria; representing 160,257 participants (85,843 females and 73,232 males) with 149,559 meat-consumers and 8584 meat-abstainers (11 to 96 years) from multiple geographic regions. Analysis of methodologic rigor revealed that the studies ranged from low to severe risk of bias with high to very low confidence in results. Eleven of the 18 studies demonstrated that meat-abstention was associated with poorer psychological health, four studies were equivocal, and three showed that meat-abstainers had better outcomes. The most rigorous studies demonstrated that the prevalence or risk of depression and/or anxiety were significantly greater in participants who avoided meat consumption. Conclusion: Studies examining the relation between the consumption or avoidance of meat and psychological health varied substantially in methodologic rigor, validity of interpretation, and confidence in results. The majority of studies, and especially the higher quality studies, showed that those who avoided meat consumption had significantly higher rates or risk of depression, anxiety, and/or self-harm behaviors. There was mixed evidence for temporal relations, but study designs and a lack of rigor precluded inferences of causal relations. Our study does not support meat avoidance as a strategy to benefit psychological health.
    • Toward the future: A conceptual review and call for research and action with online communities

      Steltenpohl, Crystal N.
      The internet allows people to connect with virtually anyone across the globe, building communities based on shared interests, experiences, and goals. Despite the potential for furthering our understanding of communities more generally through exploring them in online contexts, online communities have not generally been a focus of community psychologists. A conceptual, state-of-the-art review of eight major community psychology journals revealed 23 descriptive or empirical articles concerning online communities have been published in the past 20 years. These articles are primarily descriptive and can be organized into four categories: community building and maintenance (seven articles, 30.43%), community support (six articles, 26.09%), norms and attitudes (six articles, 26.09%), and advocacy (four articles, 17.39%). These articles reflect a promising start to understanding how we can utilize the internet to build and enhance communities. They also indicate how much further we have to go, both in understanding online communities and certain concepts regarding community psychology more generally. Community psychologists involved in practice and applied settings specifically may benefit from understanding online communities as they become integral components of advocacy, community organizing, and everyday life.
    • The effect of status framing on student interest and recall reading minority figures

      Steltenpohl, Crystal N.
      This study examined the effects of framing on participant interest and retention of diversity-related material. In this study, 204 students from undergraduate psychology courses across two universities read a vignette about Kenneth and Mamie Clark. The vignette was presented in the context of one of four frames that either highlighted or did not highlight their minority status and/or their status as leaders in their field. After reading the vignette, students responded to 13 items measuring recall of the material figures and 11 items assessing their interest in these figures. Participants also responded to the Scale of Ethnocultural Empathy (SEE), Modern Racism Scale (MRS), and Color-Blind Racial Attitudes Scale (CoBRAS). The data found in the present study provided varying levels of support for the hypotheses. The effects were stronger for Illinois participants, which may be due to the larger sample size collected and/or the greater diversity of the school population. These results bring to light an interesting potential area of future research that could eventually impact school curricula. It is possible that a better understanding of effective methods for engaging students in discussions of diversity may be around the corner. Participant race, gender, location, and major all had varying degrees of an effect on the results, indicating that, like many other topics in psychology, understanding how people react to diversity discussions is not simply black and white.
    • Exploring online and gaming communities through community psychology

      Steltenpohl, Crystal N.
      Through three manuscripts, this dissertation explores the potential for understanding online and hybrid gaming communities through a community psychology perspective. The first manuscript reviews literature on online communities in major community psychology journals. Historically, community psychologists have focused on community building and maintenance, community support, communication norms, and advocacy. There are opportunities, however, to explore other topics relevant to community psychologists’ interests and collaborate with researchers in other fields. The second manuscript reports the findings of a mixed-methods survey of 496 fighting game community (FGC) members. It explores FGC members’ metastereotypes, explanations for why certain portrayals of the community exist, and their effects on the FGC. Generally, FGC members believe inaccurate stereotypes about the FGC specifically and the gaming community more generally exist, due in part to a lack of understanding and/or ulterior motives. Negative portrayals of the community are largely seen as harmful to the community. This study emphasizes understanding how communities believe others see them and how that can affect community dynamics. The final qualitative manuscript examines perspectives of the social identity of people who play games, emphasizing the importance of understanding the “gamer” identity through more than unidimensional measures like gaming habits. The variance in identity centrality, required behaviors, player motivations, and perceptions about the label highlight the complexity of the “gamer” identity label. Taken together, these manuscripts offer a rationale for and exemplars of studying online and hybrid gaming communities through a community psychology perspective. They also argue for an increased attention to opportunities for interdisciplinary work.
    • Community Psychology at a Regional University: On Engaging Undergraduate Students in Applied Research

      McKibban, Amie R.; Steltenpohl, Crystal N.
      Engaging students in service learning projects grounded in community psychology values and practices when working in a rural, conservative area provides several challenges and opportunities for faculty members. The authors share processes and outcomes from three case examples taking place between 2010 and 2013: (1) running focus groups and survey development with a local YMCA branch that predominantly serves people of color in low income housing, (2) the development of a strategic plan for the implementation of an art crawl in the local downtown community, and (3) the development and execution of an asset map evaluating supportive resources and spaces available to the local LGBTQA community. The authors reflect on feedback from students and community partners. These case examples highlight the complexity of balancing students’ skillsets, work and other life obligations, and desire to use classroom knowledge in community settings. It also highlights the importance of preparing community partners for working on applied research. We provide recommendations based on each project’s challenges and successes for universities and communities of similar demographics. Working in rural, conservative settings provide their own challenges and opportunities, but are well worth it if implemented in an intentional way, and more research is needed to strengthen our understanding of how best to engage students from a variety of social and political backgrounds.
    • Giving Community Psychology Away: A case for open access publishing

      Steltenpohl, Crystal N.; Daniels, Katherine M.; Anderson, Amy J.
      Amidst increased pressure for transparency in science, researchers and community members are calling for open access to study stimuli and measures, data, and results. These arguments coincidentally align with calls within community psychology to find innovative ways to support communities and increase the prominence of our field. This paper aims to (1) define the current context for community psychologists in open access publishing, (2) illustrate the alignment between open access publishing and community psychology principles, and (3) demonstrate how to engage in open access publishing using community psychology values. Currently, there are several facilitators (e.g. an increasing number of open access journals, the proliferation of blogs, and social media) and barriers (e.g. Article Processing Charges (APCs), predatory journals) to publishing in open access venues. Openly sharing our research findings aligns with our values of (1) citizen participation, (2) social justice, and (3) collaboration and community strengths. Community psychologists desiring to engage in open access publishing can ask journals to waive APCs, publish pre-prints, use blogs and social media to share results, and push for systemic change in a publishing system that disenfranchises researchers, students, and community members.
    • Do Others Understand Us? Fighting Game Community Member Perceptions of Others’ Views of the FGC

      Steltenpohl, Crystal N.; Reed, Jordan; Keys, Christopher
      Our perceptions of how well others understand us and our communities can affect how we see ourselves, as well as how we perceive and interact with others. Community psychologists may be interested in examining community meta-stereotypes, or how community members believe outsiders see them. The current mixed-methods study asked fighting game community (FGC) members about their perceptions of outsiders’ understanding of the FGC. We collected data from 496 FGC members, who provided descriptions of others’ perceptions of the FGC, reasons these perceptions exist, and their reactions to these perceptions. The data supported our hypotheses that FGC members feel misunderstood by non-members; gaming affiliation and media affiliation each had significant effects on FGC members’ ratings of others’ understanding. Non-gaming media were perceived as exhibiting especially high levels of misunderstanding. Respondents’ negative comments focused on non-gaming media’s overreliance on outdated stereotypes and lack of research into the community. Recommendations for community psychologists, researchers, FGC members, and media outlets are included, which may allow various stakeholders to explore key issues and sources of friction. Finally, future research directions are discussed.