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dc.contributor.authorLynn, Denise
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-04T20:57:38Z
dc.date.available2020-02-04T20:57:38Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/506
dc.descriptionPresentation. 2nd Celebration of Teaching & Learning Symposium, January 25, 2018, the University of Southern Indiana
dc.description.abstractThis project focuses on the uses of concept maps in the history classroom. They have been a useful tool in my classes (including 100-level to 400-level) to introduce students to the historical craft. However, in recent years the maps have not been as useful in engaging students on a deeper level of thinking; therefore, I have begun to experiment with changing the format of the maps. The older maps simply had students identify an author's argument/thesis, evidence, conclusions, and the student had to ask an analytical question based on their reading. Because the historical profession has become embattled in the current political context, it has become more important in the history classroom to teach students historical literacy. A new literature has emerged on how to teach those skills in the classroom (see: Downey and Long, Teaching for Historical Literacy). Additionally, the research on concept maps in the classroom have been mixed. In some literature, it is recommended that the students create their own maps, while in others it recommends having a set map. I have created a new concept map framework that asks students to identify the author's sources and test their legitimacy, additionally, the students must fix the author in the larger historical scholarship. I have also given the students the option to create their own map rather than use one that has been created for them. Another addition to the new map is a reflection question asking the students if the reading challenged their thinking. This new format is an effort to bring historical literacy into all levels of my classes, including freshman, and to encourage students to think critically about any information that they come across. I used this map during the fall 2017 semester and will present on the successes and failures of this first trial.
dc.subjectimproving student engagement and motivation
dc.titleConcept Mapping in the History Classroom
html.description.abstract<p>This project focuses on the uses of concept maps in the history classroom. They have been a useful tool in my classes (including 100-level to 400-level) to introduce students to the historical craft. However, in recent years the maps have not been as useful in engaging students on a deeper level of thinking; therefore, I have begun to experiment with changing the format of the maps. The older maps simply had students identify an author's argument/thesis, evidence, conclusions, and the student had to ask an analytical question based on their reading. Because the historical profession has become embattled in the current political context, it has become more important in the history classroom to teach students historical literacy. A new literature has emerged on how to teach those skills in the classroom (see: Downey and Long, Teaching for Historical Literacy). Additionally, the research on concept maps in the classroom have been mixed. In some literature, it is recommended that the students create their own maps, while in others it recommends having a set map. I have created a new concept map framework that asks students to identify the author's sources and test their legitimacy, additionally, the students must fix the author in the larger historical scholarship. I have also given the students the option to create their own map rather than use one that has been created for them. Another addition to the new map is a reflection question asking the students if the reading challenged their thinking. This new format is an effort to bring historical literacy into all levels of my classes, including freshman, and to encourage students to think critically about any information that they come across. I used this map during the fall 2017 semester and will present on the successes and failures of this first trial.</p>
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Southern indiana


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