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dc.contributor.authorDeligkaris, Christos
dc.date1/26/2017
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-21T16:37:35Z
dc.date.available2020-02-21T16:37:35Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/542
dc.description.abstractNumerous peer-reviewed publications in prestigious scientific journals have concluded that courses with a high level of student-engagement and active learning, decrease course failure rates, increase student learning and improve student grades. To increase student learning and decrease course failure rates, a reformed introductory physics course in electricity and magnetism was designed and implemented during the Fall 2016 semester at the University of Southern Indiana. Following recommendations from the physics education research (PER) literature, students had to read the textbook and take an online quiz prior to class in order to acquire some basic information. Class time was devoted to difficult topics and problem-solving sessions with students working in groups of four. To increase the effectiveness of group work, students periodically evaluated their group members and themselves using a validated online instrument developed for this purpose. Conceptual problems from PER were also included in problem-solving sessions during class. Student learning gains based on the PER-based Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism (CSEM) instrument will be presented and discussed. Thoughts on how to improve this student-centered active learning environment will be discussed as well.
dc.relationhttps://www.usi.edu/cetl/teaching-and-learning/teaching-and-learning-symposium/
dc.titleImplementation of a Student-Centered Active Learning Environment
html.description.abstract<p>Numerous peer-reviewed publications in prestigious scientific journals have concluded that courses with a high level of student-engagement and active learning, decrease course failure rates, increase student learning and improve student grades. To increase student learning and decrease course failure rates, a reformed introductory physics course in electricity and magnetism was designed and implemented during the Fall 2016 semester at the University of Southern Indiana. Following recommendations from the physics education research (PER) literature, students had to read the textbook and take an online quiz prior to class in order to acquire some basic information. Class time was devoted to difficult topics and problem-solving sessions with students working in groups of four. To increase the effectiveness of group work, students periodically evaluated their group members and themselves using a validated online instrument developed for this purpose. Conceptual problems from PER were also included in problem-solving sessions during class. Student learning gains based on the PER-based Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism (CSEM) instrument will be presented and discussed. Thoughts on how to improve this student-centered active learning environment will be discussed as well.</p>
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Southern Indiana
dc.event2017 Celebration of Teaching & Learning Symposium


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