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dc.contributor.authorFertig, Jason
dc.date1/26/2017
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-21T16:37:35Z
dc.date.available2020-02-21T16:37:35Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/545
dc.description.abstractFocus/Problem Statement: How can we learn about the uniqueness of our students in order to better understand and engage them? We know our students are not a homogeneous group. Enter the DISC profile. Context: I’ve used the DISC profile in my undergraduate and graduate classes for two years. It has transformed the way I see my students. Learning the profiles of my students challenged my previous assumptions about their motivation. Approach: The DISC profile is a widely-used personality inventory assessment (probably second to Myers-Briggs-MBTI). Compared to MBTI, the DISC is easier to interpret and to teach to students. I’ve successfully taught students the DISC in 1-2 class periods, whereas MBTI took much longer. Using the profiles to guide my pedagogy resulted in more engaged students and better performance on team projects. The DISC profile, based on the work of William Moulton Marston, is a 2X2 model of the interaction between introversion—extraversion and task focus—relationship focus. The model contains four main “types” Dominance (extravert/task), Influence (extravert/relationship), Steadiness (introvert/relationship), Compliance (introvert/task), with combinations of these variables yielding 15 different profiles. While 15 profiles seem cumbersome, the 2X2 model provides a simple, common framework that guides each one, thus, it avoids “learning 15 separate types.” Brief Results: Because over 50% of my students are introverts, I’ve learned to subdue my bias towards the extrovert ideal, and to teach a class the connects with all DISC profiles. Reflection: The DISC is simply to learn and administer. I wish more of my colleagues could benefit from using it in their classes.
dc.relationhttps://www.usi.edu/cetl/teaching-and-learning/teaching-and-learning-symposium/
dc.subjectstudent motivation and engagement
dc.titleDo C Students Get Better Grades? Using the DISC Profile to Enhance Classroom Engagement
html.description.abstract<p>Focus/Problem Statement:</p> <p>How can we learn about the uniqueness of our students in order to better understand and engage them? We know our students are not a homogeneous group. Enter the DISC profile.</p> <p>Context:</p> <p>I&rsquo;ve used the DISC profile in my undergraduate and graduate classes for two years. It has transformed the way I see my students. Learning the profiles of my students challenged my previous assumptions about their motivation.</p> <p>Approach:</p> <p>The DISC profile is a widely-used personality inventory assessment (probably second to Myers-Briggs-MBTI). Compared to MBTI, the DISC is easier to interpret and to teach to students. I&rsquo;ve successfully taught students the DISC in 1-2 class periods, whereas MBTI took much longer. Using the profiles to guide my pedagogy resulted in more engaged students and better performance on team projects.</p> <p>The DISC profile, based on the work of William Moulton Marston, is a 2X2 model of the interaction between introversion&mdash;extraversion and task focus&mdash;relationship focus. The model contains four main &ldquo;types&rdquo; Dominance (extravert/task), Influence (extravert/relationship), Steadiness (introvert/relationship), Compliance (introvert/task), with combinations of these variables yielding 15 different profiles. While 15 profiles seem cumbersome, the 2X2 model provides a simple, common framework that guides each one, thus, it avoids &ldquo;learning 15 separate types.&rdquo;</p> <p>Brief Results:</p> <p>Because over 50% of my students are introverts, I&rsquo;ve learned to subdue my bias towards the extrovert ideal, and to teach a class the connects with all DISC profiles.</p> <p>Reflection:</p> <p>The DISC is simply to learn and administer. I wish more of my colleagues could benefit from using it in their classes.</p>
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Southern Indiana
dc.event2017 Celebration of Teaching & Learning Symposium


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