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dc.contributor.authorSarol, Yalcin
dc.date1/26/2017
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-21T16:37:36Z
dc.date.available2020-02-21T16:37:36Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/556
dc.description.abstractMath 410, Introduction to Analysis, is a required, proof-based mathematics course that students typically take in their senior years. Due to the abstract nature of the course, students tend to see it as one of the most challenging courses in the mathematics major. The author taught this course in the traditional lecture format four times in the past and was unhappy with the results in terms of meeting learning outcomes and student engagement. In the fall of 2016, a radical transition has been made to teach this course in a modified inquiry-based setting in pursuit of meaningful active learning via student engagement and interaction during class which was expected to lead to better learning experiences and outcomes. Preliminary results suggest that student engagement was successfully achieved, however, there is not enough evidence yet to argue that student success in meeting learning outcomes is improved compared to traditional lecturing. This presentation will share the experiences and outcomes observed by the author during this transition.
dc.relationhttps://www.usi.edu/cetl/teaching-and-learning/teaching-and-learning-symposium/
dc.titleTo Lecture or Not to Lecture: An Inquiry-Based Teaching Attempt of an Advanced Mathematics Course
html.description.abstract<p>Math 410, Introduction to Analysis, is a required, proof-based mathematics course that students typically take in their senior years. Due to the abstract nature of the course, students tend to see it as one of the most challenging courses in the mathematics major. The author taught this course in the traditional lecture format four times in the past and was unhappy with the results in terms of meeting learning outcomes and student engagement. In the fall of 2016, a radical transition has been made to teach this course in a modified inquiry-based setting in pursuit of meaningful active learning via student engagement and interaction during class which was expected to lead to better learning experiences and outcomes. Preliminary results suggest that student engagement was successfully achieved, however, there is not enough evidence yet to argue that student success in meeting learning outcomes is improved compared to traditional lecturing. This presentation will share the experiences and outcomes observed by the author during this transition.</p>
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Southern Indiana
dc.event2017 Celebration of Teaching & Learning Symposium


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