Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSaxby, Lori E.
dc.date1/26/2017
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-21T16:37:36Z
dc.date.available2020-02-21T16:37:36Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/557
dc.description.abstractProblem and Context: Although students have spent countless hours in instructional settings before entering college, many have not learned how to learn. Upon entering college they are often surprised to know that strategies previously used for passing courses in the past are not compatible for developing the type of deep, long lasting learning required to be a successful college student. Few of today’s students show signs of being growth-minded, proactive, self-regulated learners. They may not recognize that learning is a process that occurs over time and, as author Linda Nilson states, that “learning is an inside job.” They know neither how learning works nor what they have to do to ensure it which may have a negative impact on grades and retention. Approach and Results: Since part of USI’s mission, and a major goal of higher education, is to create life-long learners, we have the opportunity to guide students in our courses toward a growth mindset that encourages learning by including assignments and activities that foster self-regulatory behaviors. With improved engagement in their own learning, students’ motivation also rises as they see successes due to their efforts. Research supports these efforts. Albert Bandura found that self-regulation and self-efficacy reinforce each other. As a result of self-regulated behaviors, the successful learner internalizes his locus of control and feels empowered to attribute successes and failures to his own study habits and efforts. In addition, Daniel Goleman found the ability to self-regulate predicted SAT scores more strongly than did IQ, parental education, or parental economic status. Discussion: Participants will have the opportunity to discuss how students currently learn in their classroom and how an emphasis on a growth mindset and self-regulated learning behaviors may lead to improvement in their students' motivation and success. Sample self-regulatory activities will be shared.
dc.relationhttps://www.usi.edu/cetl/teaching-and-learning/teaching-and-learning-symposium/
dc.subjectstudent motivation and engagement
dc.titleLearning is an Inside Job
html.description.abstract<p>Problem and Context:</p> <p>Although students have spent countless hours in instructional settings before entering college, many have not learned how to learn. Upon entering college they are often surprised to know that strategies previously used for passing courses in the past are not compatible for developing the type of deep, long lasting learning required to be a successful college student. Few of today&rsquo;s students show signs of being growth-minded, proactive, self-regulated learners. They may not recognize that learning is a process that occurs over time and, as author Linda Nilson states, that &ldquo;learning is an inside job.&rdquo; They know neither how learning works nor what they have to do to ensure it which may have a negative impact on grades and retention.</p> <p>Approach and Results:</p> <p>Since part of USI&rsquo;s mission, and a major goal of higher education, is to create life-long learners, we have the opportunity to guide students in our courses toward a growth mindset that encourages learning by including assignments and activities that foster self-regulatory behaviors. With improved engagement in their own learning, students&rsquo; motivation also rises as they see successes due to their efforts.</p> <p>Research supports these efforts. Albert Bandura found that self-regulation and self-efficacy reinforce each other. As a result of self-regulated behaviors, the successful learner internalizes his locus of control and feels empowered to attribute successes and failures to his own study habits and efforts. In addition, Daniel Goleman found the ability to self-regulate predicted SAT scores more strongly than did IQ, parental education, or parental economic status.</p> <p>Discussion:</p> <p>Participants will have the opportunity to discuss how students currently learn in their classroom and how an emphasis on a growth mindset and self-regulated learning behaviors may lead to improvement in their students' motivation and success. Sample self-regulatory activities will be shared.</p>
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Southern Indiana
dc.event2017 Celebration of Teaching & Learning Symposium


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record