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dc.contributor.authorSeyler, Jeff
dc.date1/26/2017
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-21T16:37:36Z
dc.date.available2020-02-21T16:37:36Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/559
dc.description.abstractShort of utilizing a flipped classroom approach, getting all students involved in classroom discussions and working out solutions to questions presented in class is a challenge. As with many science and math courses, students can learn the content best through practice and application, especially in terms of understanding mathematical relationships associated with scientific laws. I have always tried to include sample questions in class, illustrating the thought process and steps required to solve a particular problem, but I found many students were not participating or volunteering their thoughts or answers to questions presented. With the introduction of audience response systems, or clickers, I have made the effort to increase classroom participation and student interactions in my introductory and general chemistry classes. In this presentation, I will introduce my approach and provide different methods used to give students credit for their participation. I will also present some data gathered through student surveys related to how the clickers have influenced their learning and motivation towards the course.
dc.relationhttps://www.usi.edu/cetl/teaching-and-learning/teaching-and-learning-symposium/
dc.subjectstudent motivation and engagement
dc.titleInteractive Classroom Using Clickers
html.description.abstract<p>Short of utilizing a flipped classroom approach, getting all students involved in classroom discussions and working out solutions to questions presented in class is a challenge. As with many science and math courses, students can learn the content best through practice and application, especially in terms of understanding mathematical relationships associated with scientific laws. I have always tried to include sample questions in class, illustrating the thought process and steps required to solve a particular problem, but I found many students were not participating or volunteering their thoughts or answers to questions presented. With the introduction of audience response systems, or clickers, I have made the effort to increase classroom participation and student interactions in my introductory and general chemistry classes. In this presentation, I will introduce my approach and provide different methods used to give students credit for their participation. I will also present some data gathered through student surveys related to how the clickers have influenced their learning and motivation towards the course.</p>
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Southern Indiana
dc.event2017 Celebration of Teaching & Learning Symposium


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