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dc.contributor.authorValadares, Kevin
dc.date1/26/2017
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-21T16:37:36Z
dc.date.available2020-02-21T16:37:36Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/562
dc.description.abstractIn December 2015 a traditional classroom space in the Health Professions building (HP2025) was completely renovated into an interactive and flexible learning space. New furniture (from Steelcase Corporation) was incorporated to support flexible, mobile and adaptive student learning styles. In addition, the space was renovated to incorporate features geared towards interactive learning including full length and width whiteboard writable walls, enhanced wireless capacity to encourage the use of mobile devices, touch screen interactive projectors displayed on two walls, and enhanced sound, lighting and power sources. Eleven faculty (seven different disciplines) volunteered to teach full-semester courses in the Interactive room for the initial semester (Spring 2016). A Faculty Learning Community (made up of the eleven instructors and others) was initiated to share experiences, suggestions, and problems on a real-time basis. The group met monthly and the experiences shared had distinct similarities and differences. Students and faculty were also surveyed (1) in February 2016 on their initial experience interacting in the room and (2) in April 2016 on moderated relationships combining collaborative and self-regulated learning and class engagement. An analysis of this data is shaping the basis for a scholarly article. Over the course of the Spring 2016 semester, the room was also used as a “showcase” area for Administrative meetings, advisory council meetings, lunch meetings and tour opportunities. Reflection/Discussion The physical features of the room were ready on the opening day of the Spring 2016 semester although the technological features were not complete until mid-semester. This increased the frustration among faculty and students during this time period. The monthly Faculty Learning Committee meetings were of great benefit to share experiences and led to the decision to formally pursue outcomes related to collaborative and interactive environment as a scholarship opportunity. However, there was not enough time for faculty to alter their syllabus and teaching strategies to adapt to or use the features in the room before the Spring 2016 semester began. Credentials Kevin Valadares, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Health Services and let the team that converted an existing passive learning classroom space into an interactive learning environment. He has previously led efforts to transform two lecture-based classrooms (2007 & 2010) into collaborative learning environments.
dc.relationhttps://www.usi.edu/cetl/teaching-and-learning/teaching-and-learning-symposium/
dc.subjectstudent motivation and engagement
dc.titleIf You Build It, Interactive Learning Will Come . . . Sort of.
html.description.abstract<p>In December 2015 a traditional classroom space in the Health Professions building (HP2025) was completely renovated into an interactive and flexible learning space. New furniture (from Steelcase Corporation) was incorporated to support flexible, mobile and adaptive student learning styles. In addition, the space was renovated to incorporate features geared towards interactive learning including full length and width whiteboard writable walls, enhanced wireless capacity to encourage the use of mobile devices, touch screen interactive projectors displayed on two walls, and enhanced sound, lighting and power sources.</p> <p>Eleven faculty (seven different disciplines) volunteered to teach full-semester courses in the Interactive room for the initial semester (Spring 2016). A Faculty Learning Community (made up of the eleven instructors and others) was initiated to share experiences, suggestions, and problems on a real-time basis. The group met monthly and the experiences shared had distinct similarities and differences. Students and faculty were also surveyed (1) in February 2016 on their initial experience interacting in the room and (2) in April 2016 on moderated relationships combining collaborative and self-regulated learning and class engagement. An analysis of this data is shaping the basis for a scholarly article.</p> <p>Over the course of the Spring 2016 semester, the room was also used as a &ldquo;showcase&rdquo; area for Administrative meetings, advisory council meetings, lunch meetings and tour opportunities.</p> <p>Reflection/Discussion</p> <p>The physical features of the room were ready on the opening day of the Spring 2016 semester although the technological features were not complete until mid-semester. This increased the frustration among faculty and students during this time period. The monthly Faculty Learning Committee meetings were of great benefit to share experiences and led to the decision to formally pursue outcomes related to collaborative and interactive environment as a scholarship opportunity.</p> <p>However, there was not enough time for faculty to alter their syllabus and teaching strategies to adapt to or use the features in the room before the Spring 2016 semester began.</p> <p>Credentials Kevin Valadares, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Health Services and let the team that converted an existing passive learning classroom space into an interactive learning environment. He has previously led efforts to transform two lecture-based classrooms (2007 &amp; 2010) into collaborative learning environments.</p>
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Southern Indiana
dc.event2017 Celebration of Teaching & Learning Symposium


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