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dc.contributor.authorWeatherholt, Alyssa
dc.date1/26/2017
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-21T16:37:36Z
dc.date.available2020-02-21T16:37:36Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/563
dc.description.abstractFocus/Problem statement: There was a lot of content and application of the content to be covered in a three-hour course. Context: The course was Exercise Testing and Prescription in the exercise science program at Franklin College. The course objectives were: Students will be able to implement appropriate protocols for pre-participation, health screening and health-related assessment. Students will be able to evaluate data from assessments and provide safe exercise prescriptions for various populations. Students will be able to counsel clients on behavior change mechanisms. Students will be able to use industry benchmarks to promote fitness management resources. Approach: I used a combined flipped classroom and experiential learning approach (Bishop & Verleger, 2013). The flipped classroom approach was before each class session students watched lectures and measurement techniques and took quizzes on the online course site. In class, I briefly summarized the lecture, but during the rest of the session the students worked in groups doing the various activities from the lecture. The experiential learning approach was each student was assigned to a community member to schedule eight meetings to do before and after exercise assessments and six personal training sessions. The experiential learning was assessed by the documentation of the exercise sessions and one observation of a session. The students were also tested on content three times and a practical exam during the semester. Reflection/Discussion: I learned that students did well on the application of the content when working in groups and doing the skill on an outside individual several times. The most unexpected outcome from the combined teaching techniques were the students did not do well on the exams. I suggest not doing the lectures online but rather do lecture tutorials combined with group activities and working with a community member outside of class (LoPresto & Slater, 2016).
dc.relationhttps://www.usi.edu/cetl/teaching-and-learning/teaching-and-learning-symposium/
dc.subjectstudent motivation and engagement
dc.subjectlearning in specific settings or contexts
dc.titleCombined Flipped Classroom and Experiential Learning in an Exercise Testing and Prescription Course
html.description.abstract<p>Focus/Problem statement:</p> <p>There was a lot of content and application of the content to be covered in a three-hour course.</p> <p>Context:</p> <p>The course was Exercise Testing and Prescription in the exercise science program at Franklin College.</p> <p>The course objectives were:</p> <p>Students will be able to implement appropriate protocols for pre-participation, health screening and health-related assessment.</p> <p>Students will be able to evaluate data from assessments and provide safe exercise prescriptions for various populations.</p> <p>Students will be able to counsel clients on behavior change mechanisms.</p> <p>Students will be able to use industry benchmarks to promote fitness management resources.</p> <p>Approach:</p> <p>I used a combined flipped classroom and experiential learning approach (Bishop &amp; Verleger, 2013). The flipped classroom approach was before each class session students watched lectures and measurement techniques and took quizzes on the online course site. In class, I briefly summarized the lecture, but during the rest of the session the students worked in groups doing the various activities from the lecture. The experiential learning approach was each student was assigned to a community member to schedule eight meetings to do before and after exercise assessments and six personal training sessions. The experiential learning was assessed by the documentation of the exercise sessions and one observation of a session. The students were also tested on content three times and a practical exam during the semester.</p> <p>Reflection/Discussion:</p> <p>I learned that students did well on the application of the content when working in groups and doing the skill on an outside individual several times. The most unexpected outcome from the combined teaching techniques were the students did not do well on the exams. I suggest not doing the lectures online but rather do lecture tutorials combined with group activities and working with a community member outside of class (LoPresto &amp; Slater, 2016).</p>
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Southern Indiana
dc.event2017 Celebration of Teaching & Learning Symposium


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