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dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Hannah
dc.date24-Mar-20
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-02T12:41:25Z
dc.date.available2020-04-02T12:41:25Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/576
dc.description.abstractAccessibility is rooted in equality. Spaces become more accessible to marginalized groups when platforms are created, and the impacted populations are given decision making power. Inviting underrepresented communities into the conversation- and giving space for them to speak uncontested- is necessary if we are to achieve true accessibility.  According to Ryan and Bauman (2016) students with disabilities face significant challenges to completing their postsecondary education. Only 16.7% of students with disabilities succeed at earning a bachelor’s degree, compared to 34.9% of the general population. (Deckoff-Jones & Duell, 2018). Measures have been taken by various large universities to increase access for students with disabilities; however too often students with invisible disabilities go without proper accommodations. There are a striking number of cases of students who are unaware of their disability until enrolling in college. All students deserve to attend an institution that provides necessary accommodations without a lengthy waiting period or administrative obstacles. Educators at a university level should be compelled to create an environment conducive to students of all abilities; or be willing to make reasonable accommodations for students with a physical or cognitive impairment. A student’s academic performance should not suffer because of their inability and an educator’s unwillingness to collaborate.  This presentation will offer ideas to faculty, staff, and administration regarding accessibility for students with disabilities in higher education. This collective research focuses on accessibility in the classroom, campus, and engaging administrators to recognize the dire need to increase accessibility measures. This presentation aims to offer insight into helping university students with disabilities to be successful from the perspective of a graduate student with an invisible disability in the social work department.  References Deckoff-Jones, A., & Duell, M. (2018). Perceptions of Appropriateness of Accommodations for University Students: Does Disability Type Matter?. Rehabilitation Psychology, 63(1), 68-76. 
dc.relationhttps://www.usi.edu/graduatestudies/gradcolloq/
dc.relation.youtubehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jwaW_kQOX6s&list=PL7zLNdwp3vSwYAXHgqItsRO6RE7Vs7zoc&index=4
dc.relation.youtubehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jwaW_kQOX6s&list=PL7zLNdwp3vSwYAXHgqItsRO6RE7Vs7zoc&index=4
dc.titleStudents with Invisible Disabilities in Higher Education
html.description.abstract<p>Accessibility is rooted in equality. Spaces become more accessible to marginalized groups when platforms are&nbsp;created,&nbsp;and&nbsp;the&nbsp;impacted populations are given decision making power. Inviting underrepresented communities into the conversation- and giving space for them to speak uncontested- is necessary if we are to achieve true&nbsp;accessibility.&nbsp;</p> <p>According to Ryan and Bauman (2016)&nbsp;students with disabilities face significant challenges to completing their postsecondary education.&nbsp;Only 16.7% of students with disabilities succeed at earning a bachelor&rsquo;s degree, compared to 34.9% of the general&nbsp;population.&nbsp;(Deckoff-Jones &amp; Duell,&nbsp;2018). Measures have been taken by various large universities to increase access for students with disabilities; however too often students with invisible disabilities go without proper accommodations. There are a striking number of cases of&nbsp;students who are unaware of their disability until enrolling in college. All students deserve to attend an institution that provides necessary accommodations without a lengthy waiting period or administrative obstacles.</p> <p>Educators at a university level should be compelled to create an environment conducive to students of all abilities; or be willing to make reasonable accommodations for students with a physical or cognitive impairment. A student&rsquo;s academic performance should not suffer because of their inability and an educator&rsquo;s unwillingness to collaborate.&nbsp;</p> <p>This presentation will offer ideas to faculty, staff, and administration regarding accessibility for students with disabilities in higher education. This collective research focuses on accessibility in the classroom, campus, and engaging administrators to recognize&nbsp;the dire need&nbsp;to&nbsp;increase accessibility measures.&nbsp;This presentation aims to offer insight into helping university students with disabilities to be successful from the perspective of a graduate student with an invisible disability in the social work&nbsp;department.&nbsp;</p> <p>References</p> <p>Deckoff-Jones, A., &amp; Duell, M. (2018). Perceptions of Appropriateness of Accommodations for University Students: Does Disability Type&nbsp;Matter?.&nbsp;Rehabilitation Psychology, 63(1), 68-76.&nbsp;</p>
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Southern Indiana
dc.eventSpring 2020 Graduate Student Colloquium


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