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dc.contributor.authorApkhazishvili, Salome
dc.date24-Mar-20
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-02T12:41:25Z
dc.date.available2020-04-02T12:41:25Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/578
dc.description.abstractAnswering the question of how many smart technologies an average American family owns takes time to count, re-count and name the exact number. Among many smart technologies, there are, at least, two smartphones in each family. The STATISTA chart shows that from 2011 through 2019 smartphone ownership in the USA increased from 35% to 81%. Even more interesting is what the Pew Research Institute study says about the decreasing level of the generational divide. When it comes to smartphone ownership, 90% of Gen Xers (ages 39-45 this year) have it, compared to millennials (ages 23-38 this year) whose percentage rate is 93%. A smartphone appears to bridge a generational divide. Yet, there is a less qualitative research on it. This thesis project examines parent-child communication when it comes to smartphone regulation. By interviewing the parents of 10-17 years old kids, the goal is to reveal the major concerns and advantages a smartphone pose in digital parenting. At the same time, this qualitative study aims to investigate what parents and kids learn from each other when it comes to smartphone usage. In the age of increasing the presence of smartphones in our lives, the major question goes to the validity of the parental mediation model that was initially created to handle TV-challenge, but does it works with the smartphone as well?
dc.relationhttps://www.usi.edu/graduatestudies/gradcolloq/
dc.relation.youtubehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1eslE0lJt4&list=PL7zLNdwp3vSwYAXHgqItsRO6RE7Vs7zoc&index=6
dc.titleCollaborative Media Literacy: Co-using of Mobile Smartphones among Teens and Adults
html.description.abstract<p>Answering the question of how many smart technologies an average American family owns takes time to count, re-count and name the exact number. Among many smart technologies, there are, at least, two smartphones in each family. The STATISTA chart shows that from 2011 through 2019 smartphone ownership in the USA increased from 35% to 81%. Even more interesting is what the Pew Research Institute study says about the decreasing level of the generational divide. When it comes to smartphone ownership, 90% of Gen Xers (ages 39-45 this year) have it, compared to millennials (ages 23-38 this year) whose percentage rate is 93%. A smartphone appears to bridge a generational divide. Yet, there is a less qualitative research on it. This thesis project examines parent-child communication when it comes to smartphone regulation. By interviewing the parents of 10-17 years old kids, the goal is to reveal the major concerns and advantages a smartphone pose in digital parenting. At the same time, this qualitative study aims to investigate what parents and kids learn from each other when it comes to smartphone usage. In the age of increasing the presence of smartphones in our lives, the major question goes to the validity of the parental mediation model that was initially created to handle TV-challenge, but does it works with the smartphone as well?</p>
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Southern Indiana
dc.eventSpring 2020 Graduate Student Colloquium


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