• Using Clickers in the Classroom

      Eyink, Julie
      Instructors often search for ways to increase student engagement and participation during class. Learning Response Systems, known colloquially as clickers, are one potential solution. Research shows students perceive clickers positively (Han & Finklestein, 2013) and that clickers facilitate learning and engagement (Morling et al., 2008; Hake, 1998). To see if clickers had similar positive effects in my classroom, I solicited feedback from the 108 students in my Introduction to Psychology course. During the Fall 2020 semester, I used the Acadly clicker app to take attendance, ask multiple choice poll questions to gain insight into which topics students understood, and conducted discussions via the app to help ensure social distancing. 55 of those students provided feedback. Overall, students agreed Acadly facilitated learning (M = 6.15 on a 7-point scale) and engagement (M = 6.24), and that it helped them to participate in the large lecture class in a less stressful/anxiety-producing manner (M = 6.37). Resources/References For more information on Acadly, see: https://www.acadly.com/ or their help page: https://help.acadly.com/en/ Hake, R. R. (1998). Interactive-engagement vs. traditional methods: A six-thousand-student survey of mechanics test data for introductory physics courses. American Journal of Physics, 66, 64–74. Han, J. H., & Finkelstein, A. (2013). Understanding the effects of professors' pedagogical development with Clicker Assessment and Feedback technologies and the impact on students' engagement and learning in higher education. Computers & Education, 65, 64-76. Morling, B., McAuliffe, M., Cohen, L., & DiLorenzo, T. M. (2008). Efficacy of personal response systems (“clickers”) in large, introductory psychology classes. Teaching of Psychology, 35(1), 45-50.
    • Using Instructional Technology and Innovation to Facilitate Online Learning

      Schmuck, Heather; Peak, Katherin
      With the pivot to remote learning in Spring of 2020, many faculty scrambled to adapt courses with a hands-on learning component to an online format. Within the health professions disciplines, many courses present unique challenges when there is no access to equipment for practical skills demonstration and acquisition. Compounding this issue, many accreditation organizations for the various health professions require skills demonstration with an instructor for competent practice. This poster presentation will provide a reflection on how one program created an effective learning environment with remote learning for an imaging procedures course. Discussion will include the various instructional technology formats such as VoiceThread, synchronous Zoom, and student-created videos that were utilized for demonstration of hands-on skills that could not be presented and evaluated in the traditional on-campus laboratory setting. The purpose of these exercises was to encourage students to think critically about the individual steps involved in the simulation with the goal of incorporating the process into the student’s professional skill set. Additionally, innovative ideas for creating simulation equipment and laboratory space using items readily available within a home environment will be outlined. Conclusions will include reflections of lessons learned by faculty and general acceptance of the teaching strategies implemented. Presenters will offer suggestions for additional course applications and future integration into other course offerings. Considerations of the unique environments posed by both didactic and laboratory courses and strategies to promote student engagement within courses which have transitioned to an online format will also be included. By presenting this approach to learning utilized for an imaging procedures course, learners should be able to take away new ideas of the various forms of technology that can be integrated for courses requiring physical skill demonstrations. In addition to the guided discussion of the poster, the presenters intend to encourage feedback from the session attendees by inquiring about the obstacles faced by other faculty members during the transition to virtual learning and the types of instructional technologies they utilized to overcome these challenges. Learners will gain information about adaptations to consider for transitioning from a traditional course to an online course and potential obstacles that may be encountered with suggested avenues for success.
    • Using Technology to Enhance Student-to-Student and Student-to-Content Interaction in Online Courses: Reflections and Insights from the Online Course Development Program

      Cremeens, Larissa; Zhulamanova Ilfa
      For online learning to be successful, research has shown that students need to interact with their peers and the content to gain more meaning from their online courses. Learner to learner interaction is vital to building community in an online environment, which supports productive and satisfying learning, and helps students develop problem-solving and critical thinking skills, as well as feeling like part of something larger than themselves (Dixson, 2010; Lock, 2007; Swan, 2002). In one study, students who high levels of interaction with one another in their online courses reported high levels of satisfaction and learning (Swan, 2002). Learner to content is also important to creating a thriving online learning community (Dixson, 2010; Lock, 2007; Zimmerman, 2012). Zimmerman (2012) found that interaction with the course content is essential because it can contribute to successful learning outcomes and course completion. This poster presentation will showcase a course that recently went through the Online Course Development Program, EDUC 344.NO1 online course and the various ways technology enhanced the interaction between students and the interaction between the students and the course content. This poster will first identify relevant and focused content materials from podcasts, TedTalks, other videos, VoiceThread presentations, and other materials. Using up to date and various content mediums help students stay focused on the content to break up the monotony of reading textbook chapters and listening to lectures every week. The poster presentation will showcase how students used the content to interact with their peers through various technology (Padlets, VoiceThreads) by both small group and individual activities. References Dixson, M.D. (2010). Creating effective student engagement in online courses: What do students find engaging? Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. 10(2). 1-13. Lock, J. V. (2007). Laying the groundwork for the development of learning communities within online courses. Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 3(4), 395. Swan, K. (2002). Building learning communities in online courses: The importance of interaction. Education, Communication & Information, 2(1), 23-49. Zimmerman, T. D. (2012). Exploring learner to content interaction as a success factor in online courses. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 13(4), 152-165.
    • What Do I Want to Be When I Grow Up? Orientation to Graduate Study and Confirming Career Decisions

      Swenty, Constance; Hall, Mellisa
      Research Question/Context Do synchronous virtual orientation sessions with graduate students satisfactorily answer their questions about personal career choices? Students beginning a Master of Science in Nursing program may select from five different graduate specialties. This selection will determine their career opportunities for the remainder of their lifetime. Orienting students to their chosen specialty and fully emerging them in scenarios that emphasize their role selection is key to success in a graduate study and to career satisfaction. Grounding As discussed by Fedeli and Bierema (2019) adult learning requires attainment of knowledge management. The orientation sessions offered during the synchronous sessions focused on the end outcome: knowledge management. Transforming knowledge gained through coursework is of value only if it translates to improved career performance. The focus is not only on new knowledge, but on lifelong achievements of personal career goals. To support student engagement during virtual orientation, a portion of the schedule used gaming strategies to immerse students in understanding their career choices. Karpouzos and Yannakakis (2016) support how gaming impacts learners and promotes retention of new knowledge. Methods A Blackboard learning management site was created to direct students to the synchronous virtual sessions. Six separate sessions focused on role/specialty selection. A total of 88 students participated. Each session offered dedicated time for question/answers following initial discussions. The gaming session offered time for questions/answers after each career conundrum was presented. Students were required to consider their chosen specialty when responding to questions commonly encountered in work environments. Student feedback was obtained at the conclusion of the virtual sessions. Feedback was anonymous and only aggregate data were considered. Ninety five percent of students participating viewed the sessions as beneficial in answering their questions regarding the 42-credit hour curriculum and their chosen specialty. Discussion/Lessons Learned Student feedback from the virtual orientation sessions was overwhelmingly positive. Feedback requested included quantitative and qualitative responses. Student response rate was > 75% for the virtual sessions. Suggestions for improvement included limiting the total time frame from 1 ½ days of virtual sessions to one full day. No student requested to move the orientation to a face-to-face platform. Future plans for the orientation include reviewing data that compares student graduation rates between 1. face-to-face orientation sessions, 2. asynchronous orientation presented for viewing at any time in Blackboard, or 3. synchronous virtual sessions. Other graduate programs may be interested in adapting to the needs of adult learners by offering similar orientation sessions. To move learning to knowledge management, interactive scenarios focusing on issues faced by graduates could be considered for any discipline. Assuring students have chosen wisely before beginning graduate study will lead to student retention. References Fedeli, M. & Bierema, L.L. (2019). Connecting adult learning and knowledge management: Strategies for learning and change in higher education and organizations. Springer. Karpouzos, K. & Yannakakis, G.N. (2016). Emotional games: Theory and praxis. Springer.