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dc.contributor.authorGee, Carlie
dc.contributor.authorHebner, Madison
dc.contributor.authorDowns, Abigail
dc.date2022-04-06
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-04T19:35:04Z
dc.date.available2022-04-04T19:35:04Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12419/766
dc.description.abstractOccupational therapists can play a key role in oncology care by addressing impairments and disabilities along with the psychological impact of cancer on the individual. Impairments and disabilities focused by occupational therapy can include cognitive dysfunction, fatigue and poor endurance, and physical impairments leading to functional deficits. Although physical impairments are important, occupational therapists should be at the forefront of responding to the psychosocial and functional needs of patients with cancer as well. Further research is needed to examine psychosocial interventions that are used for individuals with cancer in occupational therapy. Occupational therapy is also underutilized in cancer treatment due to a variety of reasons including but not limited to lack of awareness, lack of physician referral, lower education levels of patients, lack of evidence-based practice, and lack of resources.
dc.titleOccupational Therapy and Oncology Careen_US
html.description.abstract<p>Occupational therapists can play a key role in oncology care by addressing impairments and disabilities along with the psychological impact of cancer on the individual. Impairments and disabilities focused by occupational therapy can include cognitive dysfunction, fatigue and poor endurance, and physical impairments leading to functional deficits. Although physical impairments are important, occupational therapists should be at the forefront of responding to the psychosocial and functional needs of patients with cancer as well. Further research is needed to examine psychosocial interventions that are used for individuals with cancer in occupational therapy. Occupational therapy is also underutilized in cancer treatment due to a variety of reasons including but not limited to lack of awareness, lack of physician referral, lower education levels of patients, lack of evidence-based practice, and lack of resources.</p>en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Southern Indianaen_US


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