• 2017 Celebration of Teaching & Learning Symposium Abstracts

      Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning
    • 2017 Celebration of Teaching Learning Symposium Program

      Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning
    • 2018 Celebration of Teaching Learning Symposium - Abstracts

      Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning
    • 2018 Celebration of Teaching Learning Symposium Program

      Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning
    • 3rd Annual Graduate Student Colloquium

      USI Graduate Studies
      In an effort to make this third annual Graduate Student Colloquium more accessible to our increasingly large number of students, both online as well as those on-campus, we have selected as its theme Accessibility. This theme also reflects the University of Southern Indiana’s 2015-2020 Strategic Plan, which included “access by design” as one of its three strategic goals. As the university transitions to its third strategic plan, we take this opportunity to celebrate Accessibility in all of its manifestations.
    • 3rd Celebration of Teaching & Learning Symposium Abstract Booklet

      Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning; Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning
      The abstract booklet for the 3rd Teaching & Learning Symposium, hosted by the University of Southern Indiana Center for Excellence in Teaching & Learning, February 6, 2019. The Teaching & Learning Symposium focuses on topics related to improving student learning, academic success, and curriculum in higher education.
    • 3rd Celebration of Teaching & Learning Symposium Program

      Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning
    • 4th Celebration of Teaching & Learning Symposium Abstract Booklet

      Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning
      The abstract booklet for the 4th Teaching & Learning Symposium, hosted by the University of Southern Indiana Center for Excellence in Teaching & Learning, February 5, 2020. The Teaching & Learning Symposium focuses on topics related to improving student learning, academic success, and curriculum in higher education.
    • 4th Celebration of Teaching & Learning Symposium Program

      Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning
    • A Case Study in Deploying Experiential Learning in Fast Paced, Large Online Classroom Environment

      Bačić, Dinko
      Online education is rapidly gaining momentum in higher education. Online delivery mode is especially gaining tractions with professionals looking to further their career by obtaining Master of Business Administration degree. This student segment is actively seeking for flexible learning environment to allow them to successfully balance professional career, family commitments and school obligations. Furthermore, they expect immediate benefit and practical application of newly acquired knowledge in their professional life. On the other hand, MBA granting institutions are meeting the growing demand by introducing programs and courses allowing for large enrollments (30 -250) and intensive/shorter duration (7-8 weeks). The faculty is under pressure to deliver intensive, practical, rigorous, and scalable courses. Information Visualization & Dashboarding course was offered as a newly created course in USI's rapidly growing online MBA; data analytics track. This seven-week course could meet its five main objectives by adopting highly structured experiential learning. Experiential learning is the process of learning through reflection on doing (Kolb 1984). While the value and need for experiential learning in business programs is noted in higher education (McCarthy & McCarthy 2006), successful implementation in 100% online and intensive environment that requires acquisition of technology skill to allow for 'doing' is rare. The course was delivered to 44 students of various backgrounds though 7 modules, each consisting of module overview, 6 lessons, lesson quizzes, module exam & experiential hands-on assignment with brief reflection. All instructional materials (videos, readings and assessments) were highly customized, closely coupled and reinforcing each other. The emphasis was placed on practical value of the content and immediate applicability. Students were provided the avenue for continued feedback on course structure and effectiveness. Early feedback suggests this is one of most intensive (15-20+ hours of work per week), practical and effective courses in the MBA curriculum. Early indication is that this course structure can scale to hundreds of students with incremental investment in academic coaches and technology mentoring. Kolb, D (1984). Experiential Learning as the Science of Learning and Development. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. McCarthy, P. R., & McCarthy, H. M. (2006). When Case Studies Are Not Enough: Integrating Experiential Learning Into Business Curricula. Journal of Education for Business, 81(4), 201-204.
    • A Furry Friend: An Autoethnography on the Relationship Between Gender Identity and Fursonas

      Pfingston, Ben
      Transgender people identify as a gender other than the one assigned to them at birth, whether this is male, female, or something else entirely. Furries are people who have an interest in anthropomorphic animals, and many have a “fursona”, or an animal representation of the self. Furries often use fursonas to reflect a sexual or gender identity. LGBT+ people are a majority in the furry fandom, and there are more transgender people than in the general population. Given that transgender people are more common in the furry community, research looking into the relationship between gender development and furry identity could yield interesting insights. The following project is an autoethnography done by a trans man who is a furry. His previous and current fursonas were dated and redrawn. Then, these fursonas were analyzed based on appearance and the author’s life events at the time, with a focus on his relationship to his gender. The analysis indicates that, not only did his fursonas change with his gender, but that the fursonas themselves were used as a tool for gender exploration. The use of a fursona to explore gender was useful in many ways, including it being risk-free in terms of internal discomfort as well as externally. These findings may be significant for people who are looking for a safe way to explore their relationship with their gender.
    • A Process for RN-BSN Program Evaluation

      Connerton, Charlotte; Doerner, Mary
      Topic/Problem Statement Evaluation of a programs outcomes is necessary to support a programs curriculum. Nursing programs are accredited by various bodies, yet each accrediting body expects the nursing program to evaluate itself to ensure the students are meeting the program outcomes. The purpose of this project is to develop the process for Registered Nurses Baccalaureate of Science in Nursing (RN-BSN) program assessment through mapping of key assignments to program outcomes and assessment rubrics development to demonstrate student achievement of program outcomes. Faculty use of assessment rubrics will determine student learning and achievement of program outcomes. Context The University of Southern Indiana on-line RN-BSN program has six program outcomes. While regulatory bodies look at prelicensure programs and NCLEX pass rates, it is also essential to evaluate the effectiveness of RN-BSN programs. There was no clear data to demonstrate achieve of program outcomes. Licensed RNs are required to complete nine nursing courses. Specific courses assignments were identified with key evidence to demonstrate the students achievement of program outcomes. Grounding A search of literature using three online databases revealed limited published research related to nursing program evaluation. Literature reviews reveal much of the published evaluation research focuses on evaluation of individual courses or instructional methods rather than systematic program evaluation (Horne & Sandmann, 2012; Russell, 2015). Research related to use of rubrics in program evaluation focused on interrater reliability for grading individual student written assignments (Kilanowski & Bowers, 2017), mapping competencies to course assignments (Laux & Stoten, 2016). The lack of overall program evaluation research supports the need for study and development of effective processes for documentation of outcomes and program evaluation. Approach The project was submitted for Institutional Review Board for approval. The project was identified as a quality improvement project. Two workshops were conducted in May 2019. Day 1 was to examine the courses for key assignments and identify evidence that would demonstrate achievement of program outcomes. Day 2 was the development of the assessment rubrics with the assistance of an Assessment Consultant. Assessment rubrics were piloted in six classes in Summer 2019. Face validity of assessment rubrics were determined by two faculty not participating in the workshop. Assessment rubrics were revised based on the comments from the faculty reviewers and will be piloted in additional courses. Reflection/Discussion/Lessons Learned The piloting of the rubrics by faculty identified concerns with the provision of evidence needed to demonstrate achievement of program outcomes. The face validity reviewers provided vital feedback and suggestion on how to modify the assessment rubric ensure the measurement of identified outcomes. Assessment rubrics were revised based on feedback from the faculty participating in the pilot and face validity reviewers. Face validity review and discussion provided clarity on how the assessment rubrics needed to be modified to demonstrate the evidence of students achieving program outcomes. This was a collaborative effort between the faculty of the RN-BSN program. The face validity reviewers taught outside of the RN-BSN program. Measurement of student learning and achievement of program outcomes will begin Summer 2020. References Horne, E. M. & Sandmann, L. R. (2012). Current trends in systematic program evaluation of online graduate nursing education: An integrative literature review. Journal of Nursing Education, 51, 570-578. https://doi.org/10.3928/01484834-20120820-06 Kilanowski, J. F. & Abbott, M. B. (2017). Investigating interrater reliability in an online RN-to-BSN program: Disparate conclusions. Journal of Nursing Education, 56, 360-363. https://doi.org/10.3928/01484834-20170518-08 Laux, M. & Stoten, S. (2016). A statewide RN-BSN consortium use of the electronic portfolio to demonstrate student competency. Nurse Educator, 41, 275-277. https://doi.org/10.1097/NNE.0000000000000277 Russell, B. H. (2015). The who, what, and how of evaluation within online nursing education: State of the science. Journal of Nursing Education, 54, 13-21+sup. https://doi.org/10.3928/01484834-20141228-02
    • Accent Reduction Strategies for Higher Employability

      Morgan, Virginia
      Foreign accents can sometimes have an impact on the credibility of an individual trying to obtain employment. Accents of certain individuals may change the way ones views their intelligence and trustworthiness. There are many strategies that one can take for accent reduction in order to highlight employability. The judgements of those that are interviewing candidates often is reliant upon what they have been exposed to in their own lives. In order to teach those that are interviewing, one must look at those strategies that lessen the gap between the foreign languages at hand. One must look at strategies for not only those that are interviewing, but also the employers and teachers. Many case studies showcase that the majority of those that have an accent are often presented with stating false statements than those that do not. We see this in employment rates where US immigrants have higher unemployment rates. One must look at this correlation between credibility and trustworthiness and accents during the interview process. Language characteristics of the interviewee may allow the future employer to identify the speaker’s ethnicity, creating a blockage in the employability due to lack of knowledge or stereotyping. The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) is devoted to teaching those with foreign language accents. We can use the levels the ACTFL has created with the accents in individuals looking for employment in order to train those interviewing to fully understand how and why they answer questions the way that they do. Displaying the level that a foreign accent speaker has can allow for proper employability when interviewing for a new position. With these strategies, among others, we can value those that have foreign accents and allow them to highlight their employability and diminish the higher rates of unemployment. "
    • Accessibility, Inclusivity and the Bottom Line

      Head, Jennifer
      Rationale: Corporate culture aspires to maximize the collective productivity and synergy of its employees as a means to achieve desired financial results. Objectives: This poster examines the influence of Critical Disability Theory on corporate values and hierarchies, and the deliberate and balancing force that mindful, sustained cultures of inclusivity and accessibility have on the ultimate success of corporations.  Methods: The methodologies reflected in this research include surveys, interviews, case studies and analysis of public financial results. Results: There is a positive relationship between inclusivity and organizational performance.  Deloitte reports organizations with inclusive cultures are twice as likely to meet or exceed financial targets and Gompers and Kovvali found venture capital firms with a 10% increase in female partner hires translated to a 1.5% increase in overall fund returns and 9.7% more profitable exits, where the baseline is 28.8% profitable exists for venture capital investments. Conclusions: Active commitment to a culture of inclusivity and accessibility makes a measurable and sustained impact on both productivity and innovation.  The most successful organizations have not only reexamined and adjusted their policies, but have most critically committed to ongoing, purposeful training and exercises reinforcing the tenets of inclusivity.  
    • Accessibility: ADA Compliance through the Professional Practice of Interior Design to Accommodate Americans with Hidden Disabilities

      Anderson, Alyce
      The professional practice of Interior Design encompasses the integration of functional building systems with the aesthetic application of materials. It often requires significant research and the understanding of all facets of human interaction and needs. One key aspect of such functionality relates to the concept of the physical accessibility of building spaces. A major component of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA 1990) existed in an inclusive approach to provide for the populous possessing physical limitations by removing barriers to those disabilities. More recently, a rise in the prevalence of conditions, although considered more hidden and often possessing less-physical limitations, yet still pose accessibility challenges has forced the development of an extensive list of disabilities to be covered under the ADA umbrella. Many of these conditions were included in the updated ADA Amendments Act (2008). Separately, as licensing requirements for the professional practice of Interior Designers has also grown, the National Council for Interior Design Qualifications developed a more expanded definition of the professional practice in 2018. Specifically, as shown on the organization’s website, Interior Designers are tasked with not only addressing code-compliance and physical accessibility but also should consider the mental and emotional needs of people. These expansions blow open the limited understanding of accessibility as previously addressed simply by removing physical barriers towards inclusivity. Many reasonable accommodations for these hidden disabilities require specific boundaries and often fall under federal privacy protections presenting unique challenges to inclusivity. Examples of such conditions include Autism, PTSD, ADHD and food allergies. With such a complex list of more than 55 hidden conditions under the umbrella, the functional practice of Interior Design requires a new approach. Significant research should be conducted to understand the relationship between the protection of this continuously growing segment of the population and the numerous privacy issues that preclude precaution. An approach of identifying the interconnective requirements of the hidden disability population into sets could provide the means of constructing a balanced solution of inclusive sets of boundaries within the construction of public spaces.
    • Advanced Care Planning: An Option for Quality End-of-Life Care

      Oliveira de Almeida, Taynara
      What is it? It would be inconceivable to any American to be forced to do something or be subjected to any treatment they disagree about. This is not the reality to many Americans, however, who face their last moments. Unfortunately, many Americans are still subjected to treatments, procedures, and medication they have not authorized. Advance Care Planning (ACP) is a process about reflection of goals and values and communicating them to family or friends to guarantee a patient’s wishes can be met if they are incapable in a life threating illness or an unexpected event. ACP is for every patient, their family, and the healthcare professionals involved in their care (McMahan, Knight, Fried & Sudore, 2013; Howard, et al., 2015; Respecting Choices, 2011). Legality According to the Universal Declaration of Bioethics and Human Rights (2006), no interest should overcome the well-being of an individual. The Declaration of Human Rights (1998), states that no one should go under inhumane or degrading treatment. The right to choose what treatments patients would like to receive or not is also defended by the bioethical principle of autonomy and the Patient Self-Determination Act (PSDA) (1990), a federal law that should be complied in order to people can control decisions that affect their health. Benefits Allowing patients to choose what care they would like to receive in their final moments of life guarantees dignity. By preventing unwanted treatments and procedures and guaranteeing their most important wishes. Preventing them to go under treatments that are not beneficial for them and guaranteeing they will have things that are really important to them (Houben, Spruit, Groenen, Wouters,  & Janssen, 2014). It is not possible to scientifically prove the benefits of ACP, but considering that ACP proposes a dialogue between a patient and those involve in their care, it shows benefits their relationship and prevents disagreements when the time to call for actions arrives (Kolarik, Arnold, Fischer & Tulsky, 2002, Sudore, et al., 2017). Howard, M., Bernard, C., Tan, A., Slaven, M., Klein, D., & Heyland, D. K. (2015). Advance care planning: Let’s start sooner. Canadian Family Physician, 61, 663–665. https://doi.org/10.7748/nop.29.4.19.s20 Houben, C. H. M., Spruit, M. A., Groenen, M. T. J., Wouters, E. F. M., & Janssen, D. J. A. (2014). Efficacy of advance care planning: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 15(7), 1–13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2014.01.008 Kolarik, R. C., Arnold, R. M., Fischer, G. S., & Tulsky, J. A. (2002). Objectives for Advance Care Planning. Journal of Palliative Medicine, 5(5), 697–704. https://doi.org/10.1089/109662102320880516 McMahan, R. D., Knight, S. J., Fried, T. R., & Sudore, R. L. (2013). Advance care planning beyond advance directives: Perspectives from patients and surrogates. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 46(3), 355–365. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2012.09.006 Organização das Nações Unidas. (1998). Declaração Universal dos Direitos Humanos. Brasília. Respecting Choices. (2011). First Steps ACP Interview Tool. United States of America. Sudore, R. L., Lum, H. D., You, J. J., Hanson, L. C., Meier, D. E., & Pantilat, S. Z. (2017). Defining advance care planning for adults: a consensus definition from a multidisciplinary delphi panel. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 53(5), 821–832. The Patient Self-Determination Act. A matter of life and death. - PubMed - NCBI. ([s.d.]). Retrieved February 17th ,2020, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10141946 UNESCO. (2006). Declaração Universal sobre Bioética e Direitos Humanos. Lisboa. U.S. Congress: Patient Self-Determination Act. Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA), Pub L 101- 508 (1990).
    • An Inquiry-Based Approach to Teaching Introduction to Proof

      Gentle, Adrian P.
      In recent years I have become increasingly dissatisfied with the depth of engagement and student learning in my classes. As a result, in fall 2016 I implemented an inquiry-based learning (IBL) approach to teaching introduction to proof, a required course for mathematics majors which aims to introduce students to careful mathematical reasoning and transition them away from an algorithmic view of mathematics. IBL engages students in guided discovery, and in this talk I describe my transition to this evidence-based, student-centered approach. Rather than follow a traditional textbook, students work through carefully sequenced notes which contain key definitions and statements of important theorems, and students are required to construct proofs and solve non-trivial problems. Class time is spent with students presenting their work on the board, or working in small groups, with students responsible for building understanding through discussion and questioning. A significant increase in student engagement and community was observed in the first semester of the IBL class. I will discuss what worked and what did not, and argue that a transition to evidence-based teaching not only benefits students, but provides instructors with an opportunity to revitalize their classrooms.
    • Atypical use of audience response system provides students the opportunity to formatively assess faculty teaching and improve learning outcomes

      Hopper, Mari K.; Carroll, Megan; Wright, Serena
      Use of audience response systems (“clickers”) offer faculty the ability to formatively assess student learning. Unfortunately, this technology is very rarely - if ever - used to provide students the opportunity to formatively assess faculty teaching. Over the past two years, Indiana University School of Medicine completely reformed its curriculum. Reform efforts led to a variety of innovative and experimental teaching and learning methods. One new method involved a series of nine classroom sessions that were based on clinical cases and engaged a panel of experts (physiologist, pathologists, pharmacologists, and physicians). Panel presentations were interactive, and delivered course content via livestream to all 360 second year medical students enrolled at nine different campus sites. In order to assess the effectiveness of this entirely new approach, a series of four questions were delivered via an audience response system to all students at the end of each three hour session. Students responded to the following questions:  1) To what degree has this session required you to utilize higher order skills?; 2) on a scale of 1-10 rate your overall level of engagement; 3) estimate the percentage of time you remained focused; and 4) please share what went well and suggestions you have for improvement. Response to questions following the first session indicated that only 10% of students viewed the session as requiring very high levels of engagement, 55% of students reported high to very high levels of engagement, and 55% felt they remained focused for 70% or more of the class period. Students provided many informative responses to open ended questions. Based on student input, faculty made revisions prior to delivery of the next class session (next day) including addition of more challenging and interactive questions, narrative to slides, and summation of cases.  Each day changes were made based on student input. By the ninth (final) session, over 30% of students indicated the session required very high levels of higher order skills, 80% reported high to very high levels of engagement, and 75% felt they were able to remain focused over 70% of the session. At all levels of education, student feedback is essential as faculty seek to design applicable and intellectually challenging learning exercises that students find useful and enjoyable. In this study, innovative use of an audience response system allowed faculty to gather student feedback that resulted in improvement in student engagement, focus, and utilization of higher order skills.
    • Audit and Artificial Intelligence: A Literature Review

      Bradley, David | Stradtner, Allison | Seitz, Jamie
      Recently, artificial intelligence (AI) has moved to the forefront of bringing efficiency and convenience to various activities. AI has been engineered toward learning from user inputs and data to “think” like humans and make predictions and recommendations to carry out tasks and improve processes (“Short Primer,” n.d.). Meanwhile, the fields of accounting and finance have encountered efficiency issues due to the high-volume and variety of data involved in monitoring and analyzing financial information. The professionals within the business are aiming to use technology to automate repetitive, tedious tasks and allow more time for building organizational strategies and advising clients. This literature review was conducted to gain a better understanding of how artificial intelligence can assist in the accounting discipline of auditing. Virtual interviews were also conducted to obtain first-hand experience with current AI systems.
    • Be Good to You!

      Gruenewald, Steve
      A survey by the American College Health Association indicated that three out of five students experienced overwhelming anxiety, and two out of five students were too depressed to function (Roy, 2018). There has been a significant increase in the number of students being referred to a mental health provider after showing signs of distress in their daily interactions at school, etc. Living Works has gatekeeper training for individuals called the Applied Suicide Intervention Skills (ASIST) program. Living Works estimates that ASIST has prevented over 300,00 suicide attempts (Living Works, 2020). Part of the ASIST program encourages the development of regular self-care activities. The Be Good to You! activity was developed and implemented to provide students a self-care activity. Many students are simply in need of a healthy release for the stressor that is affecting them. The activity has been used for over three years with positive feedback from both undergraduate and graduate students. The activity is presented as a regular course assignment given to all students, regardless of the course delivery platform. The activity is introduced the first day of the semester and the students have until the week before finals week to complete the activity. Be Good to You! has two parts. The first part is to get instructor approval for the activity and then post proof that the activity was completed. This proof is usually a selfie photo of the student engaged in the activity. Students have engaged in getting a massage, mani-pedi, attending sporting events, playing with animals at the local humane society, hiking, surfing, running in a marathon, Christmas caroling, going to the zoo with their nieces and nephews, getting a deluxe facial treatment, clothes shopping, and many other activities. Students have given positive comments on the activity in the course evaluations. One student commented that this assignment should be part of every college course because the assignment required them to focus on themselves and relax doing something that brings them joy. Another student wrote that this assignment has proven that stepping back from the stress of school gave a renewed energy for studying and will be something they do regularly in the future. Several students commented that this one assignment helped them to stay present and better manage the imposed requirements of their classes and life experiences. In-class feedback from students has been positive and several students felt that this activity had a positive impact on their feelings about school. Providing this activity as part of the course sends a message that taking time for yourself and destressing can bring the student's perceptions and life more into balance. References Living Works. (2020, January 13). Living Works. Retrieved from Living Works Corporation Web site: https://www.livingworks.net/history Roy, N. (2018, December 17). Higher Education Today. Retrieved from higheredtoday.org: https://www.higheredtoday.org/2018/12/17/rise-mental-health-college-campuses-protecting-emotional-health-nations-college-students/