Now showing items 1-20 of 345

    • Punishing the Powerful: A Study of Prosecutorial Misconduct in the Era of Ethics Reforms

      Jalain, Caroline
      Within the courtroom workgroup, prosecutors, along with judges, have a lot of discretion. From starting an investigation, to pressing charges, offering a plea deal, all the way through the sentencing phase, prosecutors participate in every phase of a criminal case. Unsurprisingly, with great autonomy and power come opportunities to abuse such power. This presentation will discuss the main prosecutorial ethics reforms of the past couple of decades and how they have influenced the commission of acts of misconduct by prosecutors.
    • Appendix 5. John Chappellsmith letters in the Smithsonian Archives

      Kimberling, Clark
      Referenced in the chapter, “John Chappellsmith of Sheffield, London, and New Harmony: Artist and Writer,” in the book-in-progress, “That Wonder of the West…:” New Harmony on the Wabash."
    • Appendix 4. Twelve John Chappellsmith letters and one Margaret Chappellsmith letter published in Index, a Weekly Paper devoted to Free Religion, Toledo, Ohio, 1870-1880

      Kimberling, Clark
      Referenced in the chapter, “John Chappellsmith of Sheffield, London, and New Harmony: Artist and Writer,” in the book-in-progress, “That Wonder of the West…:” New Harmony on the Wabash."
    • Appendix 3. Items in the New Harmony Advertiser by or about John or Margaret Chappellsmith, 1858-1860

      Kimberling, Clark
      Referenced in the chapter, “John Chappellsmith of Sheffield, London, and New Harmony: Artist and Writer,” in the book-in-progress, “That Wonder of the West…:” New Harmony on the Wabash."
    • Appendix 2. Writings by John Chappellsmith and Margaret Chappellsmith in The Boston Investigator, April 11, 1860 – January 15, 1879

      Kimberling, Clark
      Referenced in the chapter, “John Chappellsmith of Sheffield, London, and New Harmony: Artist and Writer,” in the book-in-progress, “That Wonder of the West…:” New Harmony on the Wabash."
    • Appendix 1. Articles by Margaret Reynolds (later Chappellsmith) in the London Dispatch

      Kimberling, Clark
      Referenced in the chapter, “John Chappellsmith of Sheffield, London, and New Harmony: Artist and Writer,” in the book-in-progress, “That Wonder of the West…:” New Harmony on the Wabash."
    • Improving the Credibility of Empirical Legal Research: Practical Suggestions for Researchers, Journals and Law Schools

      Chin, Jason M; DeHaven, Alexander C; Heycke, Tobias; Holcombe, Alexander O; Mellor, David T; Pickett, Justin T; Steltenpohl, Crystal N; Vazire, Simine; Zeiler, Kathryn
      Fields closely related to empirical legal research (ELR) are enhancing their methods to improve the credibility of their findings. This includes making data, analysis codes and other materials openly available on digital repositories and preregistering studies. There are numerous benefits to these practices, such as research being easier to find and access through digital research methods. However, ELR appears to be lagging cognate fields. This may be partly due to a lack of field-specific meta-research and guidance. We sought to fill that gap by first evaluating credibility indicators in ELR, including a review of guidelines for legal journals. This review finds considerable room for improvement in how law journals regulate ELR. The remainder of the article provides practical guidance for the field. We start with general recommendations for empirical legal researchers and then turn to recommendations aimed at three commonly used empirical legal methods: content analyses of judicial decisions, surveys and qualitative studies. We end with suggestions for journals and law schools.
    • Psychological Science Accelerator: A Promising Resource for Clinical Psychological Science

      Beshears, Julie; Gjoneska, Biljana; Schmidt, Kathleen; Pfuhl, Gerit; Saari, Toni; McAuliffe, William H.B.; Steltenpohl, Crystal Nicole; Onie, Sandersan; Chartier, Christopher R.; Moshontz, Hannah
      Recent methodological reforms have succeeded in improving the rigor, accessibility, and transparency of psychological science, but these advances have not successfully proliferated certain subfields, including clinical psychology. Large-scale, crowdsourced collaborations offer clinical psychological scientists a way to conduct rigorous research on a scale not otherwise accessible to most researchers. The Psychological Science Accelerator (PSA) is an international collaborative network of psychological scientists that facilitates rigorous and generalizable research. In this chapter, we describe how the PSA can help clinical psychologists and clinical psychological science more broadly.
    • Society for the Improvement of Psychological Science Global Engagement Task Force Report

      Steltenpohl, Crystal Nicole; Montilla Doble, Lysander James; Basnight-Brown, Dana; Dutra, Natalia Bezerra; Belaus, Anabel; Kung, Chun-Chia; Onie, Sandersan; Seernani, Divya Prakash; Chen, Sau-Chin; Burin, DI; et al.
      The Society for the Improvement of Psychological Science (SIPS) is an organization whose mission focuses on bringing together scholars who want to improve methods and practices in psychological science. The organization reaffirmed in June 2020 that “[we] cannot do good science without diverse voices,” and acknowledged that “right now the demographics of SIPS are unrepresentative of the field of psychology, which is in turn unrepresentative of the global population. We have work to do when it comes to better supporting Black scholars and other underrepresented minorities.” The purpose of the Global Engagement Task Force, started in January 2020, was to explore suggestions made after the 2019 Annual Conference, held in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, around inclusion and access for scholars from regions outside of the United States, Canada, and Western Europe (described in the report as “geographically diverse” regions), a task complicated by the COVID-19 pandemic and civil unrest in several task force members’ countries of residence. This report outlines several suggestions, specifically around building partnerships with geographically diverse open science organizations; increasing SIPS presence at other, more local events; diversifying remote events; considering geographically diverse annual conference locations; improving membership and financial resources; and surveying open science practitioners from geographically diverse regions.
    • The Polymediated Experience of Broadcasting and Consuming Highly-Skilled Video Game Gameplay

      Luttrull, Benjamin
      This thesis explores how the increase in accessibility of live broadcasting platforms for players of video games, such as Twitch.tv, affects the ways highly-skilled game players are using their gameplay to create content to be consumed by others. For players and viewers who commit to beating a game as quickly as possible, or speedrunning it, preference for this type of content leads to both groups coming together in community around their shared gameplay interests. This paper applies the polymedia theory of Madianou and Miller (2013) and the concept of polymediation (Calka, 2015) to explore how these groups experience gameplay in a mediated setting. Through ethnographic observations at a major speedrunning broadcasting event and a public chat server, and follow-up interviews and Super Mario World gameplay, three ways in which this type of gameplay content is mediated are analyzed. First, it is mediated through the deliberate, audience-focused additions of technological and gameplay-enhancing content. Second, it is mediated through a purposeful separation of casual gaming for entertainment from “serious” gameplay as a craft. Finally, it is mediated through the engagement and collaboration of an inclusive gameplay-centered community.
    • Analysis of Wheel and Tire Drum Testing Surfaces

      Hagan, Tristan
      The purpose of this project is to further the knowledge of Accuride’s dynamic fatigue testing processes. Accuride currently uses two different types of radial drum testing stations. The radial drum testing stations utilize a large diameter driven drum that will rotate. A wheel and tire assembly will press against the drum where the friction from the drum and the tire causes the wheel and tire assembly to rotate along with the driven drum. When this rolling effect is created a substantial load is placed upon the wheel and tires assembly to accelerate the fatigue test. This dynamic radial drum test is set to show the wheels ability to perform in the industry, where they are continuously used on large vehicles within the trucking industry. The cycles needed to pass the test standards are set according to the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), Association of European Wheel Manufacturers (EUWA) and other international organizations. All new wheel designs, wheel material changes, or wheel modifications must be tested to be qualified for sale. It is important to know that the different radial drum station types are similar when completing a fatigue test. There are two different styles of radial drum testing stations which are the concave and the convex systems, which refers to the side of the drum the wheel and tires assembly is placed upon. The goal of this analysis is to gain understanding of the effects each different type of radial drum stations has on the wheel.